Cities with the same name, and other city-related matters

sound shift

Senior Member
English - England
More "other city-related matters" than "cities with the same name":

Typical British cock-up: "Nuremburg" instead of "Nuremberg". Presumably it happens because in (British) English we give both "-berg" and "-burg" a neutral vowel, but that's still no excuse. :(
 
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  • berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    More "other city-related matters" than "cities with the same name":

    Typical British cock-up: "Nuremburg" instead of "Nuremberg". Presumably it happens because in (British) English we give both "-berg" and "-burg" a neutral vowel, but that's still no excuse. :(
    From a German phonological point of view, the missing umlauts are actually a more serious mistake.;) If you pronounced "Nuremburg" in German [nʊʁəmbʊʁk], people might not understand which city was meant. If you said "Nüremburg" or "Nueremburg" [nʏʁəmbʊʁk] (ue is a spelling variation of ü), people probably would.

    The third deviation from the German spelling Nuremburg ~ Nürnberg is actually ok. The spelling with -em- is a historical local spelling (e.g. here).
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But "Nuremberg" is an anglicised spelling, not a mistake with the German spelling. ;) Even if we were to spell it "Nueremberg" or "Nüremberg" in English, people's pronunciation wouldn't change, because the vast majority know no German and therefore don't know that ue and ü are pronounced /ʏ/.
     
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    rusita preciosa

    Modus forendi
    Russian (Moscow)
    I was once in a small shop in Bend, Oregon and the shopkeeper asked where I was from. I replied Moscow and she said "Wow, that's a long drive - did you get any snow on the way?". I was quite shocked and didn't know what to say. It turned out she thought I drove from Moscow, Idaho that is about 6-7 hours away by car.

    There was a similar instance about me flying to Birmingham, UK and someone was thinking Birmingham, Alabama, but I can't recall what the conversation was.

    I think sometimes it makes sense to give a city the "last name". :)
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    I was once in a small shop in Bend, Oregon and the shopkeeper asked where I was from. I replied Moscow and she said "Wow, that's a long drive - did you get any snow on the way?". I was quite shocked and didn't know what to say. It turned out she thought I drove from Moscow, Idaho that is about 6-7 hours away by car.

    There was a similar instance about me flying to Birmingham, UK and someone was thinking Birmingham, Alabama, but I can't recall what the conversation was.

    I think sometimes it makes sense to give a city the "last name". :)
    Well, I guess, in theory, it is possible to drive to Oregon from Russia, by way of Siberia, Alaska and Canada. That is a LONG drive with snow :D
     

    francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Sometimes I hear on Slovak tv or I read in articles "v maďarskej Budapešti", "v poľskej Varšave" etc... , that is "in Hungarian Budapest", "in Polish Varsaw" and similars. There are some cities with these names in the USA (not with Slovak orthography, of course), but in this case it's surely not the reason. Have you encountered something similar in your language/country?
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    In German media journalist try to supply additional information in a "by the way" fashion in subsequent sentences. E.g. in an article about, say, Kuala Lumpur they would refer to the city in one sentence as "Kuala Lumpur", in the next sentence as "die malaysische Hauptstadt" ("the Malaysian capital") and in a third sentence as "die Sechs-Millionen-Stadt" ("the six million inhabitants city"). In German it is considered bad style to repeat the same word in close by sentences and this way they try to kill two birds with one stone: avoid repetition of the name Kuala Lumpur and inject some background information. I guess this is supposed to be extremely subtle but when all the media do this it gets annoying. What drives me up the wall is that at some point in an article they have to (must be some kind of a obsessive–compulsive disorder affecting the entire profession) refer to people solely by his/her age ("der 60-Jährige sagte unserem Reporter..." - "the 60 years old told our reporter...").
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    In German media journalist try to supply additional information in a "by the way" fashion in subsequent sentences. E.g. in an article about, say, Kuala Lumpur they would refer to the city in one sentence as "Kuala Lumpur", in the next sentence as "die malaysische Hauptstadt" ("the Malaysian capital") and in a third sentence as "die Sechs-Millionen-Stadt" ("the six million inhabitants city"). In German it is considered bad style to repeat the same word in close by sentences and this way they try to kill two birds with one stone: avoid repetition of the name Kuala Lumpur and inject some background information. I guess this is supposed to be extremely subtle but when all the media do this it gets annoying. What drives me up the wall is that at some point in an article they have to (must be some kind of a obsessive–compulsive disorder affecting the entire profession) refer to people solely by his/her age ("der 60-Jährige sagte unserem Reporter..." - "the 60 years old told our reporter...").
    In English, it's the same scenario but it extends to every word. In good style you're not supposed to repeat any! Luckily English can draw on words from Latin, Greek, French, Anglo-Saxon and Germanic backgrounds so there's a fine sampling to choose from but sometimes you still have to search for synonyms.
     

    Nanon

    Senior Member
    français (France)
    Same in other languages, I fear. I remember that some years ago, when I listened to the weather forecast on Arte (German-French TV channel), I was slightly irritated when hearing 'le pays de Goethe' instead of Germany - it sounded so false, and tell me who had read anything by Goethe among TV viewers :p... I wonder how the German side of Arte called France.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Same in other languages, I fear. I remember that some years ago, when I listened to the weather forecast on Arte (German-French TV channel), I was slightly irritated when hearing 'le pays de Goethe' instead of Germany - it sounded so false, and tell me who had read anything by Goethe among TV viewers :p... I wonder how the German side of Arte called France.
    I do want to gag every time I hear someone say "La langue de Shakespeare" or "La langue de Molière".
     

    JeanDeSponde

    Senior Member
    France, Français
    I do want to gag every time I hear someone say "La langue de Shakespeare" or "La langue de Molière".
    Yet this is for the exactly same reason as you said previously
    In English, it's the same scenario but it extends to every word. In good style you're not supposed to repeat any!
    When "en anglais" is expected — don't say it. Say "la langue de Shakespeare".
    It sure is stupid not to repeat something you haven't said yet — now is it more stupid, if you come to think of it, than not repeating something you just said...?
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    I can't say I have ever felt even the slightest bit offended when an American specified Paris, France or London, England; as anyone familiar with North American geography should know, there are any number of Paris' and Londons in America thus the addition makes perfect sense; but to each his own.

    Now, when continental Europeans are under the impression that Ireland is part of England, or Latvia is somewhere in Russia, I'm a little less forgiving.

    I rebel against that too - it is so stupid to talk about "England" when you really mean the U.K. - and maybe even Scotland!

    And at least Germans ought to be aware of at least one Paris apart from Paris, France. That is Paris, Texas.

    But it is not only in America that you have several "copies" of famous cities. We actually have a small village by the name of "Berlin", only about 50 km north of Hamburg. We have some other, less German copycat names along the Baltic coast, and while we still had the four-digit postal code system I counted 29 cities/towns/villages called "Neustadt". Every four-digit code covered a whole community so all the boroughs of larger cities also called "Neustadt" are not among those 29.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Yet this is for the exactly same reason as you said previouslyWhen "en anglais" is expected — don't say it. Say "la langue de Shakespeare".
    It sure is stupid not to repeat something you haven't said yet — now is it more stupid, if you come to think of it, than not repeating something you just said...?
    I suppose that the French are more into euphemism and clichés than synonyms or non-repetition. None are really necessary, of course, and probably stilted.

    When writing a paper and going through the list of "think, believe, deem, hold, view, aver, opine, consider, ponder, cogitate, reflect" so as not to repeat one, it is definitely not natural, and anyone who has written knows so. It's like an exercise searching for another way to say the same thing. The form becomes more important than the idea. This is actually what makes writing tough and daunting for so many people.

    Pedro is right. Langue de Shakespeare sounds just awful in English. The euphemism is not even subtle. Plus the person using it is trying to sound witty, but the opposite effect is achieved as it is used so much it is overkill. Rather than synonyms, the French love learning expressions and repeatedly using them. Even in English. Most of the written reports and correspondence I have seen written by Frenchmen contain the fillers "in a nutshell" and "we may wonder if". I get the same sense of nausea every time I see them.
    I guess in every nation people have an annoying mannerism
     
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    Nanon

    Senior Member
    français (France)
    I guess in every nation people have an annoying mannerism
    Pretty much so, because la lengua de Cervantes works more or less in the same way, doesn't it? :p Cabe señalarlo :p.

    Anyway:
    • when en anglais is expected, say la langue de Shakespeare
    • when en allemand is expected, say la langue de Goethe (vous avez lu Werther ? non ? pas grave :p)
    • when en espagnol is expected, say la langue de Cervantes (même si vous n'avez jamais ouvert Don Quichotte)
    • when en italien is expected... erm... honestly, most speakers won't find any examples. La langue de Dante appears in Wikipedia, but I never heard this expression. I have heard la langue de Goldoni instead. But come on... have those people read or seen anything by Goldoni?
    • when en russe is expected, say la langue de Tolstoï notwithstanding the enormous amount of French sentences in War and Peace. Or la langue de Pouchkine if you ever happen to know that guy.
    • when en portugais is expected, say la langue de Camões even if you just know his name (more than that -even if you haven't read anything written by any lusophone writer)
    • when en chinois is expected, say la langue de Confucius (victory! you managed to mention at least one Chinese writer!)

    When Paris is expected, say la ville-lumière. When Marseille is expected, say la cité phocéenne. And so on and so forth. Even if Marseille, Texas does not exist (not sure of that, though).

    Those lists would be worth adding to Flaubert's Dictionary of received ideas :p.
     
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    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Same in other languages, I fear. I remember that some years ago, when I listened to the weather forecast on Arte (German-French TV channel), I was slightly irritated when hearing 'le pays de Goethe' instead of Germany - it sounded so false, and tell me who had read anything by Goethe among TV viewers :p... I wonder how the German side of Arte called France.
    Can we make suggestions? Käseland? Weinland? Any more French stereotypes I could use...? ;)

    The non-repetition of a word or name can be rather irritating after a while - when I was doing French A Level at school I got to the point that if I saw "L'Hexagone" one more time I contemplated throwing the book/magazine out the window! I can understand the rationale for not repeating the same names in the same article, but some of the coinings can be very jarring (as already mentioned).
     

    rusita preciosa

    Modus forendi
    Russian (Moscow)
    Australia-bound tourist ends up in Montana:)
    A 21-year-old German tourist who wanted to visit his girlfriend in the Australian metropolis Sydney landed more than 8,000 miles away near Sidney, Montana, after mistyping his destination on a flight booking Web site.
    Dressed for the Australian summer in t-shirt and shorts, Tobi Gutt left Germany on Saturday for a four-week holiday.
    Instead of arriving “down under”, Gutt found himself on a different continent and bound for the chilly state of Montana.
    “I did wonder but I didn’t want to say anything,” Gutt told the Bild newspaper. “I thought to myself, you can fly to Australia via the United States.”
    Gutt’s airline ticket routed him via the U.S. city of Portland, Oregon, to Billings, Montana. Only as he was about to board a commuter flight to Sidney -- an oil town of about 5,000 people -- did he realize his mistake.
    The hapless tourist, who had only a thin jacket to keep out the winter cold, spent three days in Billings airport before he was able to buy a new ticket to Australia with 600 euros in cash that his parents and friends sent over from Germany.
    “I didn’t notice the mistake as my son is usually good with computers,” his mother, Sabine, told Reuters.
     

    Nanon

    Senior Member
    français (France)

    “I didn’t notice the mistake as my son is usually good with computers,” his mother, Sabine, told Reuters.
    But not with spelling :p

    Käseland? Weinland?
    Germany has fine wines and cheeses, so I doubt that would work :D.
    Note that I try to place myself from a German point of view. Obviously no standard French nationalist would ever recognise that Germany has fine cheeses and wines :p.
     
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    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    But not with spelling :p


    Germany has fine wines and cheeses, so I doubt that would work :D..
    I did think that while typing it, I had a feeling I'd regret it... ;)
    (I was trying to find good positive French stereotypes. Plus I didn't know the German for Rude Parisian Waiter Land...! :D)

    I have had some cracking German wines before (afraid I have little experience of German cheese though other than what gets served up in hotel breakfast buffets).
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    ..Germany has fine wines and cheeses, so I doubt that would work :D.
    Note that I try to place myself from a German point of view. Obviously no standard French nationalist would ever recognise that Germany has fine cheeses and wines :p.
    I agree ; I'm NO Nationalist, but please name me one German fine wine or cheese, (ONE that other people actually know of, that is.) While I do recognise that fine German wines & cheeses exist ; the problem is - none spring to mind like when I try to think of one. While with France it's hard to know which of any 2000 cheeses; one might omit without causing (too much) offence : Compté, Cambert, Oussau-Iraty, Roquefort, Chèvre, Pont l'Evêque, Tomme de Savoie,

    While I'm pretty sure I could find half a dozen German cheeses I've tasted and liked ; I'm really far from sure anybody on this forum would recognise any of them!

    Example of regional issue : "Langres" is a short drive from me, love the cheese, people in Australia will have heard of it. Can't touch that! Source : here
     

    sabs14

    Member
    German - Austria
    Wow, what an interesting thread.

    When I read the title, I thought about something like Monaco (the principality) and Monaco (Munich in Italian).
    But I guess that you don't need an identifying "last name" in this case since one refers to basically a country and the other one to a city (thus you have different prepositions, don't you?). Sorry, I'm terribly out of practice with my Italian...
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    Agreed. However, Americans ought to be aware that saying "London, England" or "Paris, France" when speaking to Europeans can come over as highly condescending.
    I don't think so. At least in Germany, I think, everybody knows of Paris, Texas - and I think it is common knowledge that there is a whole bunch of Londons, Hamburgs and Berlins all over North America. What is less known is that there are at least two Berlins in Germany.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    I agree ; I'm NO Nationalist, but please name me one German fine wine or cheese, (ONE that other people actually know of, that is.) While I do recognise that fine German wines & cheeses exist ; the problem is - none spring to mind like when I try to think of one. While with France it's hard to know which of any 2000 cheeses; one might omit without causing (too much) offence : Compté, Cambert, Oussau-Iraty, Roquefort, Chèvre, Pont l'Evêque, Tomme de Savoie,

    While I'm pretty sure I could find half a dozen German cheeses I've tasted and liked ; I'm really far from sure anybody on this forum would recognise any of them!

    Example of regional issue : "Langres" is a short drive from me, love the cheese, people in Australia will have heard of it. Can't touch that! Source : here

    But there are totally different reasons for that. In neighbouring countries most people who drink wine know of Riesling, Burgunder and such. But French cuisine and wine has build up a totally different image over a few centuries. This probably does not have to do with quality, rather than with the fact that people who had learned the trade of French cuisine were spread all over Europe after the Revolution. And what wine is concerned - France produces a lot more of it and has a lot more different areas where wine may come from, than Germany does.
    It is like: Name one good Northern German wine - that is just as good as: Name one good Irish wine.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Australia-bound tourist ends up in Montana:)
    A 21-year-old German tourist who wanted to visit his girlfriend in the Australian metropolis Sydney landed more than 8,000 miles away near Sidney, Montana, after mistyping his destination on a flight booking Web site.
    Dressed for the Australian summer in t-shirt and shorts, Tobi Gutt left Germany on Saturday for a four-week holiday.
    Instead of arriving “down under”, Gutt found himself on a different continent and bound for the chilly state of Montana.
    “I did wonder but I didn’t want to say anything,” Gutt told the Bild newspaper. “I thought to myself, you can fly to Australia via the United States.”
    Gutt’s airline ticket routed him via the U.S. city of Portland, Oregon, to Billings, Montana. Only as he was about to board a commuter flight to Sidney -- an oil town of about 5,000 people -- did he realize his mistake.
    The hapless tourist, who had only a thin jacket to keep out the winter cold, spent three days in Billings airport before he was able to buy a new ticket to Australia with 600 euros in cash that his parents and friends sent over from Germany.
    “I didn’t notice the mistake as my son is usually good with computers,” his mother, Sabine, told Reuters.
    :D:D :eek:
    Just saw this Rusita. Now, that is a compelling reason never to forget to say Sydney, Australia. :)
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    ...
    It is like: Name one good Northern German wine - that is just as good as: Name one good Irish wine.
    Vines need a certain amout of sunshine to ripen. North Germany's gastronomic renown is probaly for Beer & wurst. Irish whiskey is known far and wide.

    Riesling, would be an Alsatian wine hear in France. Burgunder, never heard of it, but may have drunk some during my year in Germany.
     
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    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    I'm really far from sure anybody on this forum would recognise any of them!
    If you bet on this you would lose. As a native I would of course recognize some traditional regional but also some modern industrial cheeses. You are right that there are no German cheeses with internationally renowned brand images. The traditional attitude towards cheese is different than in Italy or France. It is an every day food not an object of sophistication or national pride.

    With respect to wine, things are a bit different. German wine has efficiently destroyed its international image through cheap exports in the mid 20th century ("Liebfrauenmilch") but also internally as a consequence of an industrialization of wine growing in the 1970s were traditional quality labels (Kabinett, Spätlese, etc.) were equated with banal chemical measures like sugar contents. This is, thank God, overcome how.
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    When I read the title, I thought about something like Monaco (the principality) and Monaco (Munich in Italian).
    But I guess that you don't need an identifying "last name" in this case since one refers to basically a country and the other one to a city (thus you have different prepositions, don't you?). Sorry, I'm terribly out of practice with my Italian...
    No, because we use the same preposition for cities and city-states/little countries (for example one "va in Francia" but he "va a Malta/Panama/Andorra/Monaco).

    In Italian "Monaco" = "Monaco" (or Monte Carlo) while "Munich" = "Monaco di Baviera".
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Another cities which have the same name: "Rabat" in Morocco and in Malta ^^. The spelling might be different in English/French but in Arabic, it's the same.

    Also, "Madina" again in Malta and "Madina" in Saudi Arabia (although it's hard to confuse both, since the one in Saudi Arabia has a long name, "Madina al munawwara")
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    There are many places called Paris, Moscow, Warsaw in the United States -- this might be the reason. The Eifel Tower- that might be different, although who knows -- many things are created in Hollywood and Disneyland, so someone may still have doubts where the film is taking place. ;)
    After college I was a travelling salesman in the USA. On three successive weeks I called home to mom to talk. On each occasion I was in Watertown. Watertown, NY, then Watertown, CT, and then Watertown, MI.

    To this date my mom thinks I was making these all up. And I'm sure that there are more Watertowns out there.

    In Connecticut alone there is a Watertown, a Waterford, and a Waterbury.
     

    rusita preciosa

    Modus forendi
    Russian (Moscow)
    Here is a fun fact (do I sound like Sheldon?:D):

    Riverside is the most common city name in the US, while Springfield (often thought of as the most common) is not even in top 10.

    Riverside can be found in all but four states (it does not exist in Hawaii, Alaska, Louisiana, and Oklahoma).The runner up was Centerville in 45 states, followed by Fairview (43 states), Franklin (42), Midway (40), Fairfield (39), Pleasant Valley (39), Troy (39), Liberty (38), and Union (38). Springfield isn't even in the top ten (only 35 states have a Springfield).
    There is no town that is present in all 50 states.
     
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    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Košice - 2nd biggest town in Slovakia
    Košice - 2 villages in Czech Republic

    Žilina - 4th biggest town in Slovakia
    Žilina - 2 villages in Czech Republic

    Trnava - 7th biggest town in Slovakia
    Trnava - 3 villages in Czech Republic

    Katowice - 10th biggest town in Poland
    Katovice - village in Czech Republic
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    There is an interesting long documentary on Deutsche Welle television in which journalists from Berlin, Germany have made a point to go around the world visiting, documenting, meeting the locals of all the Berlin sister cities around the world. Apparently there are almost a hundred. Berlin, Russia; Berlin, El Salvador; Berlin, Papua New Guinea; Berlin, Guinee; Berlin, Ohio; Berlin, New Jersey; Berlin, Texas; Berlin, Bolivia.... There are more but I can't remember. It's funny to see a small hamlet in the middle of the desert with a small sign saying Berlin.
     

    Unoverwordinesslogged

    Banned
    English - Britain
    No, but isn't it France that's part of Belgium?:confused:
    Kidding aside, besides Elsass-Lothringen and English Flanders (pale of Calais), definitely bits of France up there annexed from little old Belgium and Luxemburg too. I think most of the rim of nowadays France is annexed land, and quite lately too.

    A good deal of this annexed land (moreso northern France rather than the 'subloirean France') now within France is utterly thanks to British blessing of French imperialism with the endgame of snubbing/thwarting Great Britain's real historical rivals: Dutch and German interests. It's all about the proxy. It's all about the money. Check out Canadian history to see the how much more the British economic knowhow was compared to the Francophones.

    Like in carving up Africa and Asia, France went for quantity (primitive glory and satisfaction) whilst the British went for quality (money) - so Britain oft turnt a blind eye to continental French imperialism (braggadocio oft borne from an historical sense of insecurity within France) as long as the Dutch and Germans where somehow at the recieving end of it - meant less (top) rivals and more monies and power for the British.
     
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    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    "Sur" in Oman and "Sur" (known as "Tyr" in English/French) in Lebanon. Both cities have the same name in Arabic (صور/Su:r) because the Phoenicians are presumed to be originally from Southern Arabia (Yemen and Oman) and immigrated to the Eastern Mediterranean bank.

    I agree ; I'm NO Nationalist, but please name me one German fine wine or cheese, (ONE that other people actually know of, that is.) While I do recognise that fine German wines & cheeses exist ; the problem is - none spring to mind like when I try to think of one. While with France it's hard to know which of any 2000 cheeses; one might omit without causing (too much) offence : Compté, Cambert, Oussau-Iraty, Roquefort, Chèvre, Pont l'Evêque, Tomme de Savoie,
    Hello,

    where have you seen it written "compté"? Or even "Cambert"? Are those old names/spelling? Because I know "comté" and "camembert" but never seen the spelling "compté" nor a cheese called "cambert"...
     
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    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    "Sur" in Oman and "Sur" (known as "Tyr" in English/French) in Lebanon. Both cities have the same name in Arabic (صور/Su:r) because the Phoenicians are presumed to be originally from Southern Arabia (Yemen and Oman) and immigrated to the Eastern Mediterranean bank.

    There is no evidence that the Phoenicians came from Southern Arabia. For the town in Phoenicia the juxtaposition of Ṣūr and Greek Tyros point to an ancient form with ظ. Thus the place name in Oman cannot very well be cognate with the one in Lebanon.
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    There is no evidence that the Phoenicians came from Southern Arabia. For the town in Phoenicia the juxtaposition of Ṣūr and Greek Tyros point to an ancient form with ظ. Thus the place name in Oman cannot very well be cognate with the one in Lebanon.
    Je ne fais que citer ce que dit Philippe Hitti à propos de l'origine des Phéniciens. C'est également ce que ma prof d'arabe m'a appris (elle est syrienne) a l'aide de nombreuses sources. Je serai prêt à les lui réclamer si vous les voulez.

    Alors comment expliquez vous la similitude des noms? Serait-ce une simple coïncidence? Ou peut être que c'est la ville libanaise qui a donné son nom à la ville omanaise?

    Ps: je ne cherche pas à vous contredire, juste à connaître vos hypothèses à ce sujet :).
     
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    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    There are so many different ideas in this very interesting thread!
    Rusita's story of the German tourist who wanted to go to Sydney, Australia but ended up in Sidney, Montana
    reminded me of the story of a young man trying to fly home to Oakland, California. He had been vacationing in Germany and had flown from London to
    Los Angeles. The flight from LA to Oakland was only 400 miles, but he ended up going MUCH further than that on his flight to Aukland, New Zealand!
    Not until Tahiti was mentioned during an in-flight announcement did Lewis realize his predicament.

    Lewis told a customs officer at Auckland Airport that he had arrived in Los Angeles aboard an Air New Zealand flight from London and followed the crowd, many of whom were traveling on to Auckland.

    "He was asked where he was going. He said 'Oakland,' received a boarding pass and got back on the same aircraft," the officer said. Source
    Quite a good case for specifying "Oakland, California" or "Auckland, New Zealand" I'd say!
    (Or for airline ticket agents to better inspect/read passengers' tickets!!! [This happened in 1985, when they were a bit more lax about such things.])
     

    franknagy

    Senior Member
    • Budapest (Hungary) is often mixed up with Bucharest (Romania).
    • Who knows more "San José" towns than the one inCalifornia, Bay Area, USA and the other, the capital of Costa Rica? I think there must be many others within the Spanish speaking word.
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    In Sweden there are three cities that begin with Karls-: Karlsborg, Karlshamn, Karlskrona and two cities beginning with Karl-: Karlstad and Karlskoga. Some people have difficulties placing Lidköping and Linköping in the right county, as one is in Västergötland and the other in Östergötland.
     
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