city that gave rise to a global pandemic

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  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    As a way of saying 'the city where the pandemic started' I think you can use 'gave rise to'. If it's not strictly literal, it is descriptive.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    As W city was engulfed by the coronavirus, the Chinese author Fang Fang worked late into the night, writing a daily chronicle of life and death in her home city that gave rise to a global pandemic.
    She Kept a Diary of China’s Epidemic. Now She Faces a Political Storm.

    Hello,
    Is it customary to say a place gives rise to a pandemic? I remembered in most cases it's some diseases or virus that bring about an endemic or pandemic.
    I agree with Chez's "non-literal" comment.. There haven't been that many pandemics, so "customary" is not really appropriate. Old names used places to identify the disease like "Spanish flu", "Asian flu". Recently, such names are no longer encouraged, so a stigma is not associated with the location. The pandemic "arose" in W city but it (obviously) didn't "cause" it.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Another problem with the sentence is that it's possible to interpret it as saying her chronicle gave rise to a global pandemic. That's what my brain saw first.

    writing a daily chronicle of life and death in her home city that gave rise to a global pandemic
     

    Oswinw011

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Another problem with the sentence is that it's possible to interpret it as saying her chronicle gave rise to a global pandemic. That's what my brain saw first.

    writing a daily chronicle of life and death in her home city that gave rise to a global pandemic
    I felt with this too. I thought it was my problem at first. Thanks, kentix, thank you all.
     
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