civilizations have been buried by the sands of time

< Previous | Next >

supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello to all,

Let's say you want to describe a historic monument. You want to say that with the passage of time a lot of civilizations are completely forgotten but one civilization still is alive and stands out because of that monument. Would this sentence work? :

Many civilizations have been buried by the sands of time, but the Mayan civilization still stands strong and is very much alive because of Chichen Itza.

I feel like there is a better way to express the idea. What is your take?
 
  • supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Sounds good to me. "Buried by the sands of time" is a cliché, but sometimes that helps make a translation sound more natural.
    Thanks. Can we say a civilization is still alive because of a monument? Is there another way to convey the significance and grandeur of one historic monument in that sentence?
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Acropolis doesn't mean that Ancient Greece as a civilization still exists, neither does Coliseum mean the Roman Empire does. The Mayan civilization passed away long ago too regardless of what still remains of it (even though some Mayan people still live).
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Acropolis doesn't mean that Ancient Greece as a civilization still exists, neither does Coliseum mean the Roman Empire does. The Mayan civilization passed away long ago too regardless of what still remains of it (even though some Mayan people still live).
    When I say that civilization is still alive I'm using alive figuratively.

    But you are right instead of that alive part I can put something better. What is your suggestion?
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Maybe I can say this? :

    Many civilizations have been buried by the sands of time, but Acropolis still stands to signify the greatness of the ancient Greek empire.

    The second part, how to make a correlation between the greatness of the monument, and the greatness of the civilization is the problem.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    "lives on"/"endures"?

    By the way, we say "the Acropolis".

    Edit: And "the Coliseum". This is because there's only one of each.
     
    Last edited:

    Delvo

    Senior Member
    American English
    You seem to be looking for a way to express a connection which doesn't really exist. The Mayans are still alive, and the monument still stands (as do some others like it), but neither of these two facts caused the other. And the Mayans are not even the current owners or managers of the old Mayan monuments; the Mexican government is.

    The only thing that the people and the monument(s) have in common is that they both represent (are the remnants of) the same fallen civilization. There are various ways to say that, with no need to make it sound as if either one of them (the monument(s) or the people) had somehow preserved the other.

    1. Although the Mayan civilization has fallen, two aspects {or we could use another word like "reminders"} of it have survived to this day: its stone monuments and its people.
    2. Along with the Mayan civilization's ancient stone monuments, its people have also survived to this day.
    3. Monuments like Chichen Itza are not all that remains of the fallen Mayan civilization; Mayan people still live in the same area as well.
    4. The Mayan people living in Mexico today are the last living representatives of the culture that once built great stone monuments like Chichen Itza.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    You seem to be looking for a way to express a connection which doesn't really exist. The Mayans are still alive, and the monument still stands (as do some others like it), but neither of these two facts caused the other. And the Mayans are not even the current owners or managers of the old Mayan monuments; the Mexican government is.

    The only thing that the people and the monument(s) have in common is that they both represent (are the remnants of) the same fallen civilization. There are various ways to say that, with no need to make it sound as if either one of them (the monument(s) or the people) had somehow preserved the other.

    1. Although the Mayan civilization has fallen, two aspects {or we could use another word like "reminders"} of it have survived to this day: its stone monuments and its people.
    2. Along with the Mayan civilization's ancient stone monuments, its people have also survived to this day.
    3. Monuments like Chichen Itza are not all that remains of the fallen Mayan civilization; Mayan people still live in the same area as well.
    4. The Mayan people living in Mexico today are the last living representatives of the culture that once built great stone monuments like Chichen Itza.
    Thanks a lot for taking time to clarify things.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    What about this one? :

    The ancient Greek civilization was buried by the sands of time a long time ago, but the Acropolis still lives on to testify to the civilization's greatness in its heyday.

    Does it sound like a cliche?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top