claim / insist / admit to someone?

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tryyrt42

New Member
Korean
I want to know whether "to her", "to his colleagues", "to me" parts in the following sentences are natural or not.
If it is not natural, why is it that? I just try to specify target when using "insist, claim, admit".
* claim = to say that something is true
* insist = to say that something is true
* admit = to agree, often unwillingly, that something is true

- I insisted on my innocence to her.
- A scientist is claiming a major breakthrough in the fight against cancer to his colleagues.
- He admitted all his mistakes to me.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello, tryyrt42.

    Welcome to the forum. :)

    We use different structures with different verbs, even when those verbs seem very similar in meaning.

    We often admit something to someone. "He admitted all his mistakes to me" is fine.

    "I insisted on my innocence to her" sounds strange to me, though I don't claim it's incorrect. I would be more likely to say "I insisted that I was innocent" or "I told her that I was innocent." Perhaps someone else will have a different opinion.
    Here is a related thread: Insist to

    I think it would be odd to claim something to someone. We would probably express the idea using different either a different structure or a different verbs:

    In a speech to his colleagues, a scientist claimed that he had made a major breakthrough in the fight against cancer.
    A scientist is telling/assuring his colleagues that he made a major breakthrough in the fight against cancer.

    In summary, and to answer your initial question, we use 'to someone' with admit, but we use other constructions with 'insist' and 'claim'.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    The third one here sounds natural. The others do not.
    With “claim” you just do that, not to a specific audience.
     
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