claim/receive/get benefit

< Previous | Next >

GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Does the sentence: "There has been increase in the people claiming/getting/receiving benefit" make any sense to you? I realize that "claim" is different to the others, but does it make sense? Also, when people claim benefit, they ask for it, no?


Thank you
 
  • ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Is that the sentence, with "...claiming/receiving/getting..." separated by a slash? Couldn't the writer decide? - Yes, 'to claim' means 'to ask for' or 'to file/apply for', as opposed to 'to get/to receive'.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    In order to receive benefit, you first have to make a claim. But people who are claiming benefit loosely means those receiving benefit.
    But are you asking about the combination of these words in one sentence?
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Of course not. I just want to know if they can be used separately in the sentence. It appears that a person can also receive and get benefit. All my questions have been answered. Thank you :).
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The context makes a difference to the choice of word.
    Just now on a TV discussion programme about immigration, one politician said (approximately) "It is not the case that Rumanians coming to the UK are more likely to claim benefit than other sectors of the population." If he had said to receive benefit, the emphasis would not be on claiming benefit.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top