clase de recuperación

mooonlight

Senior Member
Argentina, Spanish
Hi! I know that the verb is "make up for", but I don´t know wich is the noun.

I want to say " la clase de recuperacoón será el 3 de Mayo, for example"

Can be "The make-up class will be the 3rd of may" ? If my try was correct, Anyway, I´d like to know the tradictional word.

Thanks a lot!
 
  • peterfenn

    Banned
    Waray-Waray
    Make up, as in recuperate (e.g. "We have to make up for lost time"). You're right though, "make-up class" sounds like very bad English to me. mooonlight, this would mean clase de maquillaje! I would say "catch up class", or even "recuperation class".
     

    EmilyD

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    This may be one of those British vs. U.S. English moments.

    In the U.S.: "make-up class" or make-up test(exam, assignment, etc.) is commonly used. I've never heard "catch up or recuperation class".

    I'm with PaleCommander here.

    Nomi
     

    Meeracat

    Senior Member
    Make-up class, catch-up class, recuperation class. None of it makes much sense to me. Perhaps you should ask who the translation is for? If its for the US then it appears fine. If its for an English audience, it isn't. If it's for both - then back to the drawing board I say.
     

    peterfenn

    Banned
    Waray-Waray
    Make-up class, catch-up class, recuperation class. None of it makes much sense to me. Perhaps you should ask who the translation is for? If its for the US then it appears fine. If its for an English audience, it isn't. If it's for both - then back to the drawing board I say.
    Hi
    How would you put it, just out of interest (all the other posters are from the US bar you and I)?
     

    Meeracat

    Senior Member
    To be honest, peterfen, I wouldn't have a clue without more context. All we know is that moonlight is looking to translate the verb "recuperacion". "Make-up would not be my first choice.
     

    Slyder

    Senior Member
    Same way. :) Context makes it quite clear. I work at a university, and we have make-up classes and make-up tests all the time. I don't think anyone has ever been confused. ;)
    It's weird, becuase if you say:"I work at a university, and we have make-up classes and make-up tests all the time....."

    yo podría pensar que dices: Yo trabajo en la unviersidad y tenemos clases y pruebas de maquillaje todo el tiempo.

    Que tal si lo digo así:

    "I work at university, and we have to make up lost time with make-up tests ...."
     

    peterfenn

    Banned
    Waray-Waray
    To Meeracat:
    But from clase de recuperación surely it's completely clear what the context is (i.e. those classes given at school to kids who are behind due to either lack of attendance of intelligence).
     

    jinti

    Senior Member
    It's weird, becuase if you say:"I work at a university, and we have make-up classes and make-up tests all the time....."

    yo podría pensar que dices: Yo trabajo en la unviersidad y tenemos clases y pruebas de maquillaje todo el tiempo.

    Que tal si lo digo así:

    "I work at university, and we have to make up lost time with make-up tests all the time..."
    Mmm, well, I'd understand you but I'd never say it like that. (I notice you didn't change make-up tests in your example -- does that phrase make more sense to you than make-up classes?)

    Generally, it goes like something this: There's a huge snowstorm one day. The college is open, but a certain professor cancels his class anway. He announces that he will schedule a make-up class later in the semester. Nobody seriously thinks he's talking about eye shadow. ;)

    Then a student misses an exam. He goes to his professor and asks if he can take a make-up test. The professor knows he is not asking for a test on lipstick. ;)
     

    Meeracat

    Senior Member
    To peterfen
    If that is the case then perhaps we would have to look at words like "revision". That certainly rings bells from my study days. "Brushing up" is another phrase though I have never heard it used in an organised context like a class.
     

    Slyder

    Senior Member
    Mmm, well, I'd understand you but I'd never say it like that. (I notice you didn't change make-up tests in your example -- does that phrase make more sense to you than make-up classes?)

    Generally, it goes like something this: There's a huge snowstorm one day. The college is open, but a certain professor cancels his class anway. He announces that he will schedule a make-up class later in the semester. Nobody seriously thinks he's talking about eye shadow. ;)

    Then a student misses an exam. He goes to his professor and asks if he can take a make-up test. The professor knows he is not asking for a test on lipstick. ;)
    Si lo pones en ese contexto, se entiende mejor.

    Yo no cambie "make-up tests", porque no era necesario, ya que "make up lost time" es entendible y no ambiguo.

    ya que "To make up lost time" no lo vas a traducir como "maquillar el tiempo perdido", eso suena horrible.

    La verdad es que cada "phrasal verb" tiene muchos significados, en su mayoría. Ya que también me dijeron que uno puede usar "make up" cuando uno se refiere a "invent".

    :confused:Ahora me pregunto, ¿"to make up tests", también puede traducirse como "Inventar exámenes"?

    :confused:
     

    peterfenn

    Banned
    Waray-Waray
    Slyder, siguiendo lo de make up class, make up test también se podría traducir perfectamente como "control/prueba de maquillaje"! Sería igual de ambiguo (si damos por sentado lo de la confusión de make up class).
     

    Slyder

    Senior Member
    Slyder, siguiendo lo de make up class, make up test también se podría traducir perfectamente como "control/prueba de maquillaje"! Sería igual de ambiguo (si damos por sentado lo de la confusión de make up class).
    Entonces concuerdas en que no sería nada ambiguo "make up lost time".

    Ahora te pregunto, ¿tu usas "make up " para referirte a "invent"?
     

    peterfenn

    Banned
    Waray-Waray
    Totalmente de acuerdo con las dos cosas. De hecho con la segunda es mucho más natural y auténtico decir make up en lugar de invent (pero solamente con por ejemplo cuentos, historias y no con inventos).
     

    Mirlo

    Senior Member
    Castellano, Panamá/ English-USA
    Hi! I know that the verb is "make up for", but I don´t know wich is the noun.

    I want to say " la clase de recuperacoón será el 3 de Mayo, for example"

    Can be "The make-up class will be the 3rd of may" ? If my try was correct, Anyway, I´d like to know the tradictional word.

    Thanks a lot!
    Devuelta a lo que se estaba discutiendo:

    The make-up class will be May 3rd.

    En los Estados Unidos todos los estudiantes saben lo que significa "make-up class" Asi es que no te preocupes.
     

    Slyder

    Senior Member
    to peterfenn:

    Creo que tambien se dice "make up" para "hacer las pases" (become friends again). "I've made up with my sister."

    GOD, so many meanings... i'll become mad.

    solo una pregunta, como digo: ¿puedo inventar una historia?, my try:
    Can I make a story up? or Can I make up a story? or both...
     

    peterfenn

    Banned
    Waray-Waray
    Slyder
    De las dos formas, es igual.
    Lo de hacer las paces sería I've made up with my sister.
    Con los phrasal verbs desde luego es para volverte loco y perder los nervios! Pero ten en cuenta que en la gran mayoría de los casos vas a quedar infinitamente mejor y más auténtico utilizándolos en lugar de sus sinónimos de origen latino.
     

    Slyder

    Senior Member
    Slyder
    De las dos formas, es igual.
    Lo de hacer las paces sería I've made up with my sister.
    Con los phrasal verbs desde luego es para volverte loco y perder los nervios! Pero ten en cuenta que en la gran mayoría de los casos vas a quedar infinitamente mejor y más auténtico utilizándolos en lugar de sus sinónimos de origen latino.
    OK, gracias por tu ayuda!!.

    :):):)
     

    TGB

    Senior Member
    Spanish Spain
    Hola!

    Es make-up class correcto?:confused:

    Next Friday we'll make up for today's class, so we'll have a make up lesson

    A mí me suena fatal, no sé qué pensáis vosotros.

    Gracias :)
     

    azuos

    Senior Member
    SPANISH
    The teacher is ill, so today we haven´t got class. We will recover it on friday. On friday we have the recovery class.

    Yo creo que podría ser algo así aunque me suena un poco repetitivo.
    ¿No crees?
     
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