Class 8, class 8th, 8 class, 8th class

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HajiSahib

Banned
Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
Aslam: In which class do you study?
Akram: I study in 8th class. (I mean 8th grade)
I study in class 8.
I study in class 8th.
I study in 8 class.


Can you please tell me which one is correct?


Thanks you.
 
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  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you are in the 8th grade, I think it would be better to simply say 'I'm in the 8th grade'.

    I study in 8th class. (I mean 8th grade) :cross:
    I study in class 8. :confused: This sounds like the name/number of the classroom in which you study.
    I study in class 8th. :cross:
    I study in 8 class. :cross:
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    This varies by country. In the US, I believe "grade" (eighth grade) would be correct. In India it's usually "standard" (eighth standard). I suggest you use whatever is commonly used in Pakistan.

    I agree with Heypresto that "class 8th" and "8 class" are incorrect.
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    This varies by country. In the US, I believe "eighth grade" would be correct. In India it'd be "eighth standard". I suggest you use whatever is commonly used in Pakistan.

    I agree with Heypresto that "class 8th" and "8 class" are incorrect.
    Here in Pakistan we sometimes use "class" to refer to grade, though, like you, we also use the word standard. Please simply replace "class" with grade/standard in my OP and then tell me which is correct.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Please simply replace "class" with grade/standard in my OP and then tell me which is correct.
    We'd usually say "I'm in the eighth standard". However, while asking someone which year he's in, the usual question for some reason is "Which class are you in?"

    (I'm talking about the practice in India.)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'm aware that in India and Pakistan, 'class' or 'standard' is used for 'year'. I've generally seen Class 8 or Standard 8. In the UK and in Australia, it would be Year 8. In our system (like in Scotland), we restart our numbering in secondary school.
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    And "class" is much more common in India than "standard"-- "standard" is used mainly by schools of higher standards or by highly educated people. They also use "grade" though I don't know which one is more common out of the two.

    The common man is much more likely to say "class" here.

    I don't know whether you'll agree with me on that, Barque, but if you don't, I already have an explanation ready for that. ;)
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It is not natural to say "What class do you study in?". The verb "study" is not used in this way.

    In AE we say "What grade are you in?" In other countries other words are used for "grade", as discussed above. But I suspect English speakers all say "are you in", not "do you study in".

    The concept is that you are a member of a group: you are "in" that group. You are in that group for a whole school year. The name of the group is 8th grade, or Class 8, or Standard 8.
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    It is not natural to say "What class do you study in?". The verb "study" is not used in this way.
    Exactly. But Indians also use "study" all the time in that context-- it's the result of literal translation; a Hindi verb whose English synonym is usually "to study" otherwise also means to attend a school/class. Indians get trapped by that.

    (Which class do you study in?!) It's not that you study in one class that you're in and you just relax or watch cartoons all day in other classes that you're also a member of. ;):D
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    In the US we usually say eighth grade, whereas Canadian usage is grade eight.

    A class
    is generally used here to describe the group of students in a given course or classroom. Or the group of students in a high school or undergraduate university: freshman, sophomore, junior, senior class. (9th, 10th, 11th 12th grades for high school, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th years of undergraduate study).
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    I'm aware that in India and Pakistan, 'class' or 'standard' is used for 'year'. I've generally seen Class 8 or Standard 8. In the UK and in Australia, it would be Year 8. In our system (like in Scotland), we restart our numbering in secondary school.
    I am not interested in knowing which country uses which system, i.e., grade, standard, class etc.
    I just want to know how I can use a numeral (as an adjective) with a noun to qualify it. Can you please guide me in this regard?
    For example I want to qualify "year" with a numeral "2".
    I am in the 2nd year.
    I am in the year 2.
    I am in the year 2nd.
    I am in the 2 year.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I am not interested in knowing which country uses which system, i.e., grade, standard, class etc.
    Unfortunately, you have no choice in this - you must be interested as the meanings might differ. :D
    I am in the 2nd year. :tick:
    I am in the year 2. / I am in the year 2nd. / I am in the 2 year. / I am in the grade 2 / I am in the class 2. :cross:
    I am in the year 2. / I am in the 2nd year. /............................./ I am in the grade 2/ I am in the class 2. /I am in the year 2:tick:

    The cardinal number (1, 2, 3, etc.) follows the noun (grade/class/year)
    The ordinal number (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.) precedes the noun (grade/class/year) and is qualified by "the".
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I generally like to capitalise 'Year 2' (Standard 2, Form 2, Grade 2), because I regard '2' as a kind of a name. That is the reason no article is used. (There is no need for articles for names normally.)
     
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