Class-ridden

  • sererory

    Member
    UK
    Italy - Italian
    I'm sorry...
    This is the context: "If you put that research together with other research that shows a drastic increase in income and wealth inequality, you reach an uncomfortable conclusion: America looks more and more like a class-ridden society."
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It is a polemical attempt to take something as widespread as income distribution frequency, and jump to the conclusion that changes that lead to a greater concentration of wealth in the hands of a relative few constitutes a society that is afflicted by
    social classes.

    From the author's viewpoint, classes are bad. He therefore describes a society that
    has economic classes as "ridden", or suffering from the presence of classes. He may
    be right, but the logic of confusing economic concentration with classes is thin.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    It means a society which is heavily influenced by, or based on, class - usually social class. THere are many definitions of what constitutes a particular social class - economic status, standard of education, tastes and culture. Some social class types below:

    Unskilled manual worker - building labourer - working class
    Skilled blue-collar worker - plumber - working class
    White collar worker - clerk - possibly middle class
    Professional - doctor, lawyer - middle class.

    These are just examples, taken from my own society. It's a very simplistic list and wide open to criticism and amendment. For example, a plumber (working class?) might well earn more than a teacher (middle class?).
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Emma's description shows the validity of cuchu's point: "social class" does not mean the same thing in the US that it means in countries that actually have a hereditary nobility. The plumbers in the United States who would not consider themselves "middle class" are few indeed. Most building laborers would also call themselves "middle class"; the group below "middle class" is not "working class" (for those are regarded as the same thing here), but "the poor".
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is a polemical attempt to take something as widespread as income distribution frequency, and jump to the conclusion that changes that lead to a greater concentration of wealth in the hands of a relative few constitutes a society that is afflicted by
    social classes.

    From the author's viewpoint, classes are bad. He therefore describes a society that
    has economic classes as "ridden", or suffering from the presence of classes. He may
    be right, but the logic of confusing economic concentration with classes is thin.
    Economic definitions of class are not necessarily "polemical", and certainly no more so than this spirited attack on the same.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    GWB is correct. Back to the thread topic.... the writer uses 'class-ridden' to
    mean that a society has classes, or is afflicted with the horrible state of having classes. The implication is that this is a noxious state of affairs.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Emma's description shows the validity of cuchu's point: "social class" does not mean the same thing in the US that it means in countries that actually have a hereditary nobility. The plumbers in the United States who would not consider themselves "middle class" are few indeed. Most building laborers would also call themselves "middle class"; the group below "middle class" is not "working class" (for those are regarded as the same thing here), but "the poor".
    I did explicitly say that I was only talking about some definitions of class in "my own society". We surely don't need to define class and talk about the diversity of definitions in different societies in order to answer the language question.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    GWB is correct. Back to the thread topic.... the writer uses 'class-ridden' to
    mean that a society has classes, or is afflicted with the horrible state of having classes. The implication is that this is a noxious state of affairs.
    Seeing as everyone else has introduced their off-topic twopennorth: it is a noxious state of affairs. By definition, it is unequal, and therefore unjust.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Economic definitions of class are not necessarily "polemical", and certainly no more so than this spirited attack on the same.
    I fully agree, and as I started the off-topic side comments, I invite you to read the
    source material, chock full of undefined uses of terms like "caste" and "social class".
    Whether you find it cause for sympathetic head-bobbing, indignant astonishment, or
    something in between, it is clearly polemical in its condemnation of a certain regime.
    Yes, some parts of the world are indeed "regime-ridden". :)

    Looky here.
    :eek:
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you for the "source material" cuchuflete. It would be useful, in future, to know exactly what one is discussing. I did not know that some people were reading "source material".
     
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