Classical Arabic: عبد and غلام

MurtiPK

New Member
Urdu
Hello,

Both عبد and غلام mean slave. Is there a difference between them in classical Arabic?
 
  • لكن قد يلتيس اسم الجارية على البعض لأن له معنيان

    جارية =صبية + فتاة
    جارية = عبدة لمن يملكها

    عبد للرجال يقابله جارية للنساء
     
    غلام is a young boy. I was told that it originally referred to a boy in the age of puberty (13 to 15), but later it was used for any young boy regardless of age, sometimes even young adults. The root seems to support this but I don’t really have an authoritative source.

    جارية was originally a pre- teen girl. She was called so because as she hasn’t reached puberty it was easier for her to move around among men, so the women used to send her to deliver messages to the male family members who that were among other men (clubs, dinking places, or coffee houses for example). Like غلام, it later started to mean any young female including a young adult.

    That’s the meaning of both, neither mean slave. However, you would call a male slave غلام and female slave جارية because in the end they are (or at least were) a boy and a girl. The point is to be kind.

    It’s like calling a servant “boy” rather than calling him “servant”. People still do that today. For example, I always say البنت اللي بتشتغل عنا and never شغالتنا أو خادمتنا أو صانعتنا.

    عبد للرجال يقابله جارية للنساء
    عبد للذكر يقابله أمة للأنثى
     
    I may be mistaken, but عَبْد is only used in reference to God, while غُلام is used in reference to humans. Thus, we say عبد الله but not عَبْدُنا. Similarly, we say غلامُنا but not غُلام الله.
     
    I may be mistaken, but عَبْد is only used in reference to God, while غُلام is used in reference to humans. Thus, we say عبد الله but not عَبْدُنا. Similarly, we say غلامُنا but not غُلام الله.
    No, it’s the generic word for slave. However, there is a Hadith that goes:
    لا يَقُلْ أحَدُكُمْ: أطْعِمْ رَبَّكَ، وضِّئْ رَبَّكَ، اسْقِ رَبَّكَ، ولْيَقُلْ: سَيِّدِي، مَوْلايَ، ولا يَقُلْ أحَدُكُمْ: عَبْدِي، أَمَتِي، ولْيَقُلْ: فَتايَ، وفَتاتي، وغُلامِي.

    This is specifically for use with a possessive pronoun and not the general use of the words. It also doesn’t change the original meanings of any of the words.
     
    جارية was originally a pre- teen girl. She was called so because as she hasn’t reached puberty it was easier for her to move around among men, so the women used to send her to deliver messages to the male family members who that were among other men (clubs, dinking places, or coffee houses for example). Like غلام, it later started to mean any young female including a young adult.
    Were there such institutions as "clubs" "coffee houses" and "drinking places" (taverns) in the early days of Islam in Mecca and Madina? Just curious. I presume the word جارية is pretty old.
     
    Ok so there may not have been any coffee houses (probably came later), but the word was not introduced with Islam, it was older.

    Before Islam they had drinking places and clubs. By “club” I don’t mean nightclub, I just mean “a place where a group of people with similar interests or purposes sit together to talk”, you know, a club!
     
    Hello,

    Both عبد and غلام mean slave. Is there a difference between them in classical Arabic?

    I see غلام passes in arabic ,too. But while i do not know the origin of this word well, i tend to confirm the information i quote below:
    I may be mistaken, but عَبْد is only used in reference to God, while غُلام is used in reference to humans. Thus, we say عبد الله but not عَبْدُنا. Similarly, we say غلامُنا but not غُلام الله.
    Because both of these words pass in also kurdish and غلام is exactly corresponding the meaning which was proposed there. Absolutely right.
     
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