Classical/Byzantine (?) Greek: γεωργ

  • ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Γεώργ like this means nothing.

    1.
    The name Γεωργία (Georgia) can either be the female of the name George or the country Georgia. This only happens to sound like Γεωργός,Γεωργία (see below). The ancient Greeks called the area Κολχίς (Kolhis). We transcribed the modern name from the English Georgia who themselves took it from the Russians I think (who in turn took it from another language I suppose).

    2.
    a.The name George comes from the name Γεώργιος (female Γεωργία).
    b.The name Γεώργιος comes from the word γεωργός meaning he who cultivates the earth, agriculturer (γεωργία being agriculture,farming ).
    c. Γεωργός comes from the words γα/γη + έργον (earth and work).

    Γεωργός is ancient Greek but has remained unchanged throught the ages in the Greek language

    Hope that helps
     

    übermönch

    Senior Member
    World - 1.German, 2.Russian, 3.English
    ireney said:
    Γεώργ like this means nothing.

    1.
    The name Γεωργία (Georgia) can either be the female of the name George or the country Georgia. This only happens to sound like Γεωργός,Γεωργία (see below). The ancient Greeks called the area Κολχίς (Kolhis).
    Well, Kolkhis (კოლხეთი/Kolkheti in grg.) was one of two ancient Georgian kingdoms, the other being Iveria (ქართლი/Kartli in grg.).
    We transcribed the modern name from the English Georgia who themselves took it from the Russians I think (who in turn took it from another language I suppose).
    That's odd. Wikipedia tells Georgia comes from Greek. The old Persian name, Gurji, used (in other forms) in Arabian, Russian, Turkish and all other eastern countries is also supposed to be derrived from greek.:confused: :eek:
    2.
    a.The name George comes from the name Γεώργιος (female Γεωργία).
    b.The name Γεώργιος comes from the word γεωργός meaning he who cultivates the earth, agriculturer (γεωργία being agriculture,farming ).
    c. Γεωργός comes from the words γα/γη + έργον (earth and work).

    Γεωργός is ancient Greek but has remained unchanged throught the ages in the Greek language
    Thanks
    Hope that helps
    sure
     

    metaphrastes

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    That's odd. Wikipedia tells Georgia comes from Greek
    Not odd at all, Wikipedia is a never-ending work and it has for sure many wrong or imprecise info, as well some surprisingly good articles that one may only identify if knowing well that field of knowledge.

    Now, I have many Georgian friends and what they say is that Georgia never called herself "Georgia", but rather the English called the country Georgia due to their great devotion for St George. It is said they have 365 churches dedicated to St George, each one having one small relic from his body - and, as it is natural, it may be impossible to find a single one church there with no icon of St George.

    Now, what Wikipedia probably should have said is that the name Georgia, given by the English men, came from the name "George" that, ultimately, comes from the Greek Γεώργιος, since it was a Greek name that was adopted by many Christian nations, due to devotion to him, who is the patron of England, Scotia, Russia and Portugal, among other countries - and, by the way, Greece too, if memory helps me. In Portugal, the name is written "Jorge" and yes, ultimately, it comes from Greek, too, as well Georgia. But not directly from Greek, but through the Latin Georgius, as happened with most ancient names.

    The Georgian themselves, today, call their country "Sakhartveli" and their language as "Kartuli", and they still have strong devotion to St George, whom they call "Tsmida Giorgi" (გიორგი, with hard "g", not palatalized), bringing his icon with them wherever they go - and sure, "Giorgi" too comes ultimately from Greek.

    By the way, there is an article on Wikipedia about the name "George" that seems to be a good introduction: George (given name) - Wikipedia
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Italian
    The Georgian themselves, today, call their country "Sakhartveli"
    I understand that another name of Georgia is Gruzia/Gruzinia, and I wonder what the origin of this name is (any Greek connection?), and whether it is still being used nowadays. Thank you.
     

    metaphrastes

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    I understand that another name of Georgia is Gruzia/Gruzinia, and I wonder what the origin of this name is
    From what I heard from Georgian people, Gruzia is a name given by the Russians, and many of them consider it even offensive (although, sure, not every Russian speaker using it has any intention to offend at all, since it is now the standard Russian usage). I cannot recall what the exact origin of the name is, but what is certain is that Georgian themselves neither call their country Georgia nor Gruzia.
     
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