Claude le suit des yeux par....

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whomadeamark

Senior Member
English (UK)
Having trouble with this sentence:

Est-ce que Claude le suit des yeux par la fenetre? Elle utilize parfois ses jumelles de theatre.


my try (bad!):
Is Claude following the eyes to the window. She sometimes uses his/her opera glasses.


thank you!
 
  • la grive solitaire

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Is Claude watching him/it [literally: following him/it with his eyes] from the window?

    For me, there's the sense here of "watching his/its every move".
     
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    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Is Claude watching him through the window? She sometimes uses her opera glasses.
    It's utilise, and I thought Claude was a boy's name.
     

    SteveD

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Suivre des yeux" means "to follow with the eyes".

    One way to translate the sentence would be "Does Claude follow him with her eyes through the window? Sometimes she uses her opera glasses."

    The first sentence is rather awkward, though. Another way to get across the meaning of it could be simply "Does Claude watch him through the window?"

    As usual, it all depends on context.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    The dog watches you as you move. To me, follow with his eyes sounds as if the eyes have been plucked out of their sockets. I still remember as a schoolboy in London being struck by the difference from English of the French phrase suivre des yeux.
    I just googled your version and was unable to find more than a single entry that supports your it: When did your baby first follow an object with his eyes ... which, however, has a special medico-physiological sense and does not sound at all odd to me. Admittedly in the well-known WW I recruiting poster with the caption Lord Kitchener Wants You, the eyes follow you (without with), to make you feel ashamed you are not in khaki. Watch would not be sufficient here.
    Perhaps some native anglophone resident in the UK and not expatriate like both of us will kindly give us their opinion. I personally find that Spanish occasionally influences my English vocabulary and spelling, and I was once asked by an Englishman long resident in Provence if I had a good cart for my journey: he actually meant carte not charette.
    Amitiés, A. :)
     
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    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Try Googling "Mona Lisa('s?) eyes follow you" !
    No point, I have already said that Lord Kitchener's eyes follow you referring to the recruiting poster is fine. It is He follows you with his eyes that is in amicable dispute.
     
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