clear flight path

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Ribambelle

Member
Français
Bonsoir à tous,

J'ai un doute sur l'expression à utiliser en français dans la phrase suivante :

"I hear the captain speaking, good weather, clear flight path, not expecting delays."

(Le personnage qui parle se trouve dans un avion.)

Dirait-on "voie aérienne dégagée" ? Ca fait un peu pulmonaire, non ?
 
  • Magonette

    Senior Member
    French
    Cest un peu bizarre de dire ça, un peu comme si on voulait annoncer que non, on n'avait pas érigé de montagne devant la piste.
    Je suppose qu'il veut dire qu'il n'y a pas de phénomène météorologique particulier (un orage par exemple) sur la trajectoire prévue au décollage.

    Littéralement, ça serait "trajectoire de vol dégagée", mais ça ne sonne pas très bien non plus.

    Peut-être "ciel dégagé pour le décollage" ou quelque chose comme ça ...
     

    wistou

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Pour un avion, on parle de la route aéronautique qu'il va suivre.

    Ici on pourrait dire "temps clair, rien à déclarer sur la route, aucun retard à prévoir"
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'Clear flight path' is not something a pilot would normally say and it is hard to know what it might mean. Flight paths used by aircraft are always clear, except just before a collision. He might have said 'We've been cleared for take-off' but that is extremely unlikely as he would be preparing to take off at that point and not distracting himself by talking to passengers.

    'Ciel dégagé' = 'Sky clear' (ie sans nuages) but if that 's what he meant he would no doubt have said it.
     

    wistou

    Senior Member
    French - France
    "Clear flight path", as it is used here, is not related to the weather (weather is mentioned jsut before).

    The captain prbably explains that the route ahead is clear from any predictable difficult". Such difficulties could be, for example, crowded traffic, military exercises, "no-fly" zones, closed "en route" airports, unavailable radio navigation equipments, etc.... which could have an impact on flight time.
     
    Last edited:

    wistou

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Yes and no...

    Not all the circumstances I have listed would result in a predictable delay (ex: Crowded traffic at the destination airport can delay you flight,
    but things may clear-up before you reach there; for a military exercise, you have a no-traffic time-reservation for a given zone, but this limitation can be cancelled when the exercise is over, etc.. ).

    By the way, I am pretty confident with my explanation, I have been working for an airline for more than 25 years, and part of my job has been writing the software for the Operations Control Center... Regards.
     

    Magonette

    Senior Member
    French
    'Clear flight path' is not something a pilot would normally say and it is hard to know what it might mean.
    That's very correct.
    'Flight path' is not normally used during flight operations, especially during public address announcements to passengers.
    Even though it technically designates the tridimensional trajectory of an aircraft, 'flight path' is usually used to depict the vertical trajectory of an aircraft, especially when dealing with aircraft performance and the ability of aircraft to clear obstacles.
    Otherwise you would use 'route' or 'track'.
    So, as stated by 'broglet', we can't know for sure what this particular captain meant, and I do not wish to start a lengthy debate about it.
    Let's say that I can live with wistou's proposal even though I don't agree with the explanation which is given to justify it.
     
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