clearing?glade?

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gambheyhey

Senior Member
Chinese
He found Booper, after some extensive looking, high up on the Sports Deck. She was in a sunny clearing--a glade, almost--between two deck-tennis courts that were not in use.

Can anyone split hairs for me? Thanks.
I first thought the word "glade" further emphasizes that the clearing is surrounded by a forest of people, but the last part of the sentence disagrees with me by saying it's between two unoccupied tennis courts which probably indicates there ain't mant people around.

The semantic nuance is almost inexplicable to a foreigner, isn't it?
 
  • maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    I don't think 'glade' applies to anything other than a forest/woodland setting, as you suggest, but I would also suggest that 'clearing' is not the right word for a space on a 'sports deck' and would offer the suggestion that '...a sunny, secluded spot between...' might be a better construction.

    It is indeed a spot with few other people about.
     

    gambheyhey

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks maxiogee. But this is an original context from one of Salinger's novels, so I think I must dig harder to understand the difference, which might be purposefully made use of, otherwise my translation would be unfaithful.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Okay, back to your actual question ;)

    A clearing can be just a space between trees in a forest. It might have grass growing, or leaf-litter lying on it. A glade, on the other hand would definitely have grass and most likely would also havce woodland flowers growing throughout it.
    A glade would be 'prettier' than a mere 'clearing'. Perhaps it is Booper's presence which turns the clearing between the courts into a 'glade'.
    Mustn't mess with sacred texts. :D
     

    winklepicker

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    He found Booper, after some extensive looking, high up on the Sports Deck. She was in a sunny clearing--a glade, almost--between two deck-tennis courts that were not in use.
    A glade, almost is the key here: we're on a ship, I suppose, so there are no trees, presumably; so it is almost a glade because it is an open area surrounded by tall things - masts maybe?
     

    gambheyhey

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    winklepicker, very impressive!

    But the question is, a ship with a Sports Deck must be a very huge ocean liner. I am not an expert of ships, and only travled once by sea five years ago. But I don't think there are too many masts on a ship. Maybe I'am wrong. Anyone familiar with ships?
     

    winklepicker

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    But the question is, a ship with a Sports Deck must be a very huge ocean liner. I am not an expert of ships, and only travelled once by sea five years ago. But I don't think there are too many masts on a ship. Maybe I'm wrong. Anyone familiar with ships?
    No, I think you're right, gambheyhey- although Salinger was writing a while ago, masts were probably out! Having googled some pictures of sports decks I came on this. It shows a deck with one or more courts raised above the level of the deck - which would leave a lower space ('glade') between them. Does that help?
     
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