Clicking on a followed site

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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    A site that you are following can be called "a followed site." Just as this thread becomes "a followed thread" for me now because I have posted in it.
     

    taked4700

    Senior Member
    japanese japan
    Thank you, Copyright.

    I have not seen 'a followed site' many times. I think 'a followed man' would be idiomatic, but as for a site, I wonder if 'a site that you follow' would be more idiomatic.

    I think that it would be natural to follow some thing that moves with its own will, but a site would have no will that drives itself. So, I, once again, must say that 'the site you watch' or 'the site you keep reading' would be more idiomatic.

    Am I right?

    Thanks in advance.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't have a problem with a "followed site" and neither does Microsoft, apparently. I don't see "a followed man" being idiomatic; in fact, a Google search shows only 32 results, three of them entries in English language forums.

    Since we can follow a sports team, I don't see any reason not to follow a site, especially one that routinely changes its content.
     

    taked4700

    Senior Member
    japanese japan
    Thank you, Copyright.

    I think it's a matter of collocation and you said that 'a followed man' is not idiomatic, so I infer that 'a followed site' would also be as unidiomatic as 'a followed man'.

    Also, that would be a matter of personal preferences, so you are right in saying that 'a followed site' is idiomatic.

    And I guess that I would be also right in insisting that 'a followed site' would be unidiomatic.

    Thanks again,
    taked4700
     
    I don't particularly like the clunky sound of either "a followed site" or "a followed man" but I think they are grammatically correct.

    I think Microsoft's usage here is more in the area of space-saving efforts, similar to what happens in headlines.

    It's certainly briefer and to the point to say "a followed site" rather than "a site that many people are following.":)

    (In any event, "the following site" should be avoided because it could mean "the next site coming up, not this one.")

    The following Monday is not this Monday, it's next week's.:D
     

    taked4700

    Senior Member
    japanese japan
    Thank you, Dale Texas.

    It is certainly interesting to think of what 'following' means in some context.

    I must say that I see your point as very much persuading.

    That said, there is one thing that still makes me annoyed.

    If 'a followed site' could be idiomatic, 'a read book' should also be considered as idiomatic.

    Maybe there are so many examples like that. 'A liked man', 'a had dog' and 'a kicked ball' ...

    All of them seem to be unidiomatic.

    'A boiled egg' is a good example of commonly used phrase in that construction, but I wonder if 'a used phrase' is idiomatic or not.

    Thanks again,
    taked4700
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    If 'a followed site' could be idiomatic, 'a read book' should also be considered as idiomatic.
    There's your problem in a sentence.

    There is no reason to think that one particular construction can work for other similar-looking constructions. I would be surprised if that's not also true for Japanese, but even if it's not, you will only confuse yourself and slow your learning if you attempt to make up rules that don't work or try to bend a language to fit your wishes or beliefs.
     

    taked4700

    Senior Member
    japanese japan
    Thank you, Copyright.

    As you said, I have a problem. I always seek for the integrated rule that governs all the grammar rules.

    And I guess that hope would be what every foreign language learner have.

    Everyone wants to find their meaning to live their own lives.

    Every plant and every insect would have their own reasoning to make it meaningful to live their life.

    Just the same way, English learners like me are inclined to find a meaning when learning English.

    But honestly speaking, I am sorry if I made you feel annoyed or irritated. That is not my intention.

    I just can not help thinking 'a followed site' to be unidiomatic, and I do not try to persuade anyone to believe it because I know it is just an obsession of mine.

    Thanks again,
    taked4700
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "A followed site" is something you're not going to see very often – in this case, it's specifically for a computer situation and it can be thought of as shorthand, so I wouldn't be too concerned about whether or not you should use it in normal conversation or writing (you wouldn't).

    I'm not at all annoyed or irritated – but I did make my study of Cantonese easier by deciding early on that I would just learn what native Cantonese speakers said and not worry about why they said it or why there were occasional exceptions. :)
     

    taked4700

    Senior Member
    japanese japan
    Thank you, Copyright.

    I would be with you in thinking that it is wise to learn just what native speakers say and not wasting time cramming brains to seek the rules that govern all the grammar.

    Maybe I am so slow in learning languages that I need something that motives me to keep learning.

    Thanks again,
    taked4700
     
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