climb (up) (something)

Ume

Banned
Japanese
- climb a mountain
- climb up a mountain
Do you see any difference in meaning?

climb (up) (something)
to go up something towards the top
Examples:
- to climb a mountain/hill/tree/wall
- She climbed up the stairs.
- The car slowly climbed the hill.
Can I say "to climb up a mountain/hill/tree/wall," "She climbed the stairs," and "The car slowly climbed up the hill" instead of the examples above?
 
  • Shahrooz

    Senior Member
    Persian
    To me, I see no difference in meaning, While it seems you have responded to your question by explaining "climb up".

    It's a matter of choice.

    here's another example:

    A- He was busy from 8 a.m to 11 a.m with a mower.
    B- He was busy from 8 a.m to 11 a.m with a lawn mower.
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Climb usually refers to climb up, to go up something towards the top. Climb can also be followed by down which means a backing down. Climb up is an idiom
    Hi.
    If I understood what you said correctly, the equation would be;

    Climbing the mountain = Climbing up the mountain + Climbing down the mountain (+Staying for a while at the top of the mountain;) )

    Is this correct?
     
    Last edited:

    FeluccaSpanish

    Member
    Argentinian Spanish
    I think it has to do with aspect (lexicalisation patterns, I'm studying it right now :p), when you say "climb up" it means that you went all the way up the mountain, and you reached the top. It is like saying "I drank up the water". You drank all of it.

    But I'm not a native speaker, so keep it in mind.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Up" is unnecessary in both of your examples ("climbed the mountain", "drank the water"). In both examples, I would assume the action was completed (the person reached the top of the mountain and the glass was empty); if it weren't so, I'd expect "attempted to climb the mountain" and "drank some of the water".
     

    FeluccaSpanish

    Member
    Argentinian Spanish
    I 'm quoting Talmy (1985): "Aspect can be characterised as the 'pattern of distribution of action through time'. The term 'action' here applies to a static condition -the continuance of a location or state- as well as to motion or change." [...] And he gives an example:

    When it got to the end, the record automatically started over from the beginning.



    I think that, following your line of thought, Parla, Talmy would be wrong.

    My example about the water is also taken from Talmy, but I don't really know about CLIMB UP, because, as I said before, I'm not a native speaker.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'Up' indicates completion in 'eat up', 'drink up', and some relatively strong change of state in 'tear up', 'roll up', 'screw up', 'fold up', but I feel it's just the literal direction in 'climb up'. You can climb half-way up; you can spend two hours climbing up the mountain and still feel you've got nowhere; you can climb up as far as the South Col.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I think perhaps there's a bit of a BE/AE difference here.

    I don't know who Talmy is or was. (I'm a writer and editor, not an academic.) In the example you quote, I would find "from the beginning" acceptable but unnecessary.
     
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