Clinical observation of animals

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takashi0930

Senior Member
Japanese
Hello.
I've always thought that "clinical" is used about people. Clinical studies are conducted in humans, and non-clinical studies are conducted in animals. However, I sometimes see phrases like "clinical observation of animals" written by native speakers.

For example, this document prepared by the US FDA.
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation/guidances/ucm074959.pdf
Page 6, the third line from the bottom: Clinical observation of animals is generally not adequate to assess respiratory function, and thus these parameters should be quantified by using appropriate methodologies.

In this case, what does "clinical" mean?
 
  • takashi0930

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    That's not correct ... both humans and animals can undergo clinical studies.
    In the pharmaceutical industry, we usually call studies in humans "clinical studies" and studies in animals "non-clinical" studies (or "pre-clinical" studies when they are conducted before human studies).

    Also, could you answer my question? What does "clinical" means in the above example?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    From ClinicalTrials.gov:

    What Is a Clinical Study?
    A clinical study involves research using human volunteers (also called participants) that is intended to add to medical knowledge. There are two main types of clinical studies: clinical trials (also called interventional studies) and observational studies. ClinicalTrials.gov includes both interventional and observational studies.


    In looking around the internet – the source of my answer – I found several "clinical trials" and "clinical studies" related to animals.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have no problem with "clinical studies" in animals. It means studies in a clinical setting - so animals that are under veterinary care. A "non-clinical study" would be a study of people or animals outside the clinical setting - that could be anything: sleep patterns, mood variation, use of cat scratching posts, shopping habits - but I have never heard the term used. The term "non-clinical data" is used, and refers to data collected from a normal population (ie, assumed to be normally healthy).
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I have no problem with "clinical studies" in animals. It means studies in a clinical setting - so animals that are under veterinary care. A "non-clinical study" would be a study of people or animals outside the clinical setting - that could be anything: sleep patterns, mood variation, use of cat scratching posts, shopping habits - but I have never heard the term used. The term "non-clinical data" is used, and refers to data collected from a normal population (ie, assumed to be normally healthy).
    :thumbsup:
    Here's a report of a "clinical field trial" in dogs and cats. Evaluation of the long-term efficacy and safety of an imidacloprid 10%/flumethrin 4.5% polymer matrix collar (Seresto®) in dogs and cats naturally infested with fleas and/or ticks in multicentre clinical field studies in Europe
     
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