'Clink' or 'Chink'

bigbird

Senior Member
Britain, English
Further to the 'Streams' thread and the babbling or chatteringness of them, I have another sonically related query

Do glasses 'clink' or 'chink' in relation to, for example a toast and wine glasses etc (or beer depending on your tipple)?

Thanks in advance!
(I dread to think what might happen with this thread)!
 
  • bigbird said:
    Further to the 'Streams' thread and the babbling or chatteringness of them, I have another sonically related query

    Do glasses 'clink' or 'chink' in relation to, for example a toast and wine glasses etc (or beer depending on your tipple)?

    Thanks in advance!
    (I dread to think what might happen with this thread)!


    Hi Bigbird,

    As a native I've always known the phrase "to clink glasses", when you touch glasses with your friends and shout "Cheers!"

    I would say that "the clink of glasses was heard".

    "Chink", to me, refers more to a metallic sound. "The chink of coins in his pocket."



    Cheers!
    LRV
     

    bigbird

    Senior Member
    Britain, English
    Many thanks,
    I was wondering if there might be a more poetic way of saying 'clink'? It sounds a little severe.
    I'll give you the context... Im translanting an article about a deaf girl who has been fitted with some new hearing aids. The direct translation from the french is 'clink'.
    The scentence goes:
    'She can now hear the _____ of glasses, a birds song ...' etc.

    Thanks
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I wondered if bigbird had written
    ... the clink of glasses ... rather than
    ... the clinking of glasses ...?

    They sound very different to me - clink is possible with only two glasses, clinking requires many:) (I see that LRV wrote clinking in her happiness sentence.)
     
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