Clinton...cannot afford any falloff in Democratic turnout from 2012

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Failed to get "from 2012" - If it has said "Clinton...cannot afford any decrease of voter turnout like that of 2012", I would have got it. But the use of "from" is confusing to me.

Thanks in advance
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Clinton can't afford falloff
But she cannot afford any falloff in Democratic turnout from 2012 — and is talking up the chances of a Trump victory to create a sense of urgency among her supporters.

-CNN
Source
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    A certain fraction of Democratic voters actually voted in 2012. (The rest stayed home, or did not vote for some other reason.) That fraction cannot drop (fall off, or here, fall-off as a noun) if Clinton is to win.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    A certain fraction of Democratic voters actually voted in 2012. (The rest stayed home, or did not vote for some other reason.) That fraction cannot drop (fall off, or here, fall-off as a noun) if Clinton is to win.
    Does "that fraction" refer to the former? Or refer to "the rest"?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The rest will still stay home?
    The rest will not vote. The statement you are asking about does not say why.

    Suppose 70 percent of all Democrats vote. That is the turnout. A falloff in the turnout would mean that fewer than 70 percent vote. That may be 1 percent or 69.9 percent; the statement does not say anything about the size of the falloff. All we know is that Clinton's hopes depend (according to this writer) on a turnout of at least 70 percent among Democrats.
     
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