close securely [synonym for fasten?]

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Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
close securely [synonym for fasten?]

Hi teachers,

A: Well, never mind. Fasten your seat belt, and start the car Peter. Now you can drive the car, but first, check your mirror and put on your right blinker.

Thanks in advance.
 
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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm not sure why you want a synonym for "fasten" but I've only ever heard or used "fasten your seatbelt." There is no need for "securely" -- the locking system will either be engaged or not engaged. It's like saying lock the lock securely: it's either locked or it's not. :)
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I'm not sure why you want a synonym for "fasten" but I've only ever heard or used "fasten your seatbelt." There is no need for "securely" -- the locking system will either be engaged or not engaged. It's like saying lock the lock securely: it's either locked or it's not. :)
    Hi Copyright,
    Thanks for your reply. It looks redundant, doesn't it? It is just a definition, or should I say explanation, to that word. The students ask me to explain that. Since 'close securely' has a latin root, it is comprehensive for them.

    TS
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You are really fastening two things together: a button with a buttonhole, two halves of a zipper, two parts of the locking mechanism of a seatbelt.

    If they understand "close securely" as a definition, I suppose it's fine.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I am confused. When used with a seat belt, fasten doesn't mean "close." It means "join." I guess there are some occasions when fasten and close are synonymous (zippers, for example) but not very often because generally speaking some things are fastened and some things are closed, and there isn't a lot of overlap there. You fasten a diaper with a diaper pin, you fasten the strap on your helmet, you fasten the carrying strap to the camera bag, and you fasten your seat belt. You can close a door securely but you can't close a seat belt, securely or not.

    Or have I misunderstood the question?
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I accepted "close securely" (reluctantly) because it's a general definition for learners of English and in some languages "close" encompasses a wider range of actions than it might in English.

    At least that's my take on the situation. It's a simplistic convenience here that Thinking.Spain feels will work.
     
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