cloth bundle

dichelson

Senior Member
Italy/Italian
Hello: In the following sentence I'm not sure about the meaning of "cloth bundle":

"He reached over and took a small cloth bundle from the drawer of his old desk. He unwrapped the cloth and then held up a flat, platelike object"

Does "cloth bundle" indicate kind of a package made from cloth? Thank you
 
  • gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    It usually means something indeterminate, wrapped in a piece of cloth. It could be his worldly goods, food, odds and ends, or anything on the small side you could imagine.
     

    dichelson

    Senior Member
    Italy/Italian
    If you mean "like this item here", yes. It is not entirely natural to refer to something not human as "this guy".
    Maybe people have different opinions about that. I've been working a lot in the US as a chemist, and my supervisor always referred to chemical compounds in this way.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Maybe people have different opinions about that. I've been working a lot in the US as a chemist, and my supervisor always referred to chemical compounds in this way.
    It's extremely informal, but not terribly weird in speech.

    But it does look odd in writing, dichelson. I think you would be much better of avoiding using "guy" in the way you used it in this thread. I immediately thought you were talking about a man. I believe most people reading here would draw the same conclusion.

    As for bundle, I agree with others. It could be something tied, but it doesn't have to be. And the word "cloth" refers to what is used to "bundle" something, not what is IN the bundle. :)

    Gaer
     
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