cloth in your bath

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boubata

Member
Algeria languages: Arabic/English/french/ some german
Dear friends,
We usually use something (a clothe) to clean dirt from the skin ,what do you call this and what is the verb for this action please?
thanks in advance.
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Dear friends,
    We usually use something (a clothe) to clean dirt from the skin ,what do you call this and what is the verb for this action please?
    thanks in advance.
    I think you mean a "flannel" (that's what you call it round here anyway). The action is just "washing".
     

    Unknoewn13

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I'd call it a washcloth, and the action would be either washing or scrubbing (for me). I hope we're talking about the same thing:p

    Edit: Oh good; mjscott agrees haha
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    That flannel or washcloth is a facecloth here.
    OK so I know it's used to wash all kinds of bits that aren't face.
    OK so I know it seems a little odd to use that cloth to wash your face as well.
    But OK, so it's still a facecloth in my part of the world, right?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    In my AE (American English) experience, it's usually a washcloth, sometimes a facecloth.
    It's used to wash or scrub any and all body parts.
     

    Unknoewn13

    Senior Member
    English - American
    In some places its clothe and not cloth, just like shoppe vs. shop, flavour vs. flavor, organization vs. organisation, and other seemingly pointless differences.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Darn I thought I'd seen it:p
    You may well have seen it.
    As you describe it, clothe is the kind of pseudo-archaic spelling that might well be found in all kinds of places.

    The OED records spelling variants that have been reliably and repeatedly used through the years. Frivolous pseudo-archaicisms would not feature.
     

    jucami

    Senior Member
    USA (English)
    I think "flannel" must be the UK term for it. I have only heard "flannel" used as the name of a type of soft fabric.
    "Washcloth" is most common here. I thought of "rag," too, but it seems that a rag is used more for washing dishes than for washing skin.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I think "flannel" must be the UK term for it. I have only heard "flannel" used as the name of a type of soft fabric.
    "Washcloth" is most common here. I thought of "rag," too, but it seems that a rag is used more for washing dishes than for washing skin.
    I should perhaps acknowledge that flannel, or face flannel, would be understood by most literate BE-speakers.
    The man in the street here would be completely confused.
    In this context, rag doesn't mean anything to me.
    The cloth used for washing dishes would be a dish-cloth.
     

    rainbow84uk

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    It's also face-cloth where I come from in north-west England, but flannel is sometimes heard and would be understood (although it sounds rather posh to us!)
     
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