clothing items made with named lace

I'm describing dresses and t-shirts that have tulle lace on them with embroidered crosses and arches over(spanning?) them.
The lace looks like this: http://hellolace.net/wardrobe/mmm/2012/blouse/mmm_blouse_pintuckedarchedcross_add2.jpg

This lace is being used a lot by the manufacturer, and they call it (literally translated from Japanese) "original cross arch tulle lace" in their item descriptions or "cross arch (lace)" in their item names, for short. I would like to translate that to "Arched Cross" lace (or maybe "Arched Crosses" would be better?), to indicate that all items with "Arched Cross" in their name make use of the same lace and thus can be worn together/are part of the same series.

Could I name an item that makes uses of this lace an "Arched Cross lace choker", using capitals?
Or an "Arched Cross t-shirt", with capitals, but without "lace"? (I'm translating these item names from Japanese, and the manufacturer omitted the word "lace" in this item's name in Japanese, so I don't want to use it in my translation either.)

Thanks in advance!
 
  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    I see no reason to use capitals. Arched cross doesn't seem to be a proper noun. I think arched cross lace choker is as good as anything. At least, I can't think of anything better. I should leave lace in unless you're confident that your readers will know that arched cross is a kind of lace.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The problem with "cross arch tulle lace" is that it seems to lose meaning the more you say it but, on first reading, it is fine. :)

    I think that "crosses within arch tulle lace." would serve your purpose.

    Tulle modifies lace
    Arch modifies [tulle] lace
    The meaning of 'cross' becomes obvious (as a modifier to arch) when seeing the item.

    If the reader cannot see an example, you are going to have to give a brief description, e.g. "A single layer ruff collar of arched tulle lace enclosing a design of crosses"
     
    How about if I wanted to call it cross and arch lace? Would it need hyphens? Cross-and-arch lace choker? And cross-and-arch t-shirt (without "lace")? Would that work?
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    I thought I'd replied to this but something seemed to go wrong with the website. Anyway, I prefer hyphens. They make the meaning clearer. I don't know about T-shirt, though. I always imagine T-shirts to be plain cotton things.
     
    It's actually a t-shirt decorated with cross-and-arch lace.

    Does "cross-and-arch-lace t-shirt" (do I need the hyphen between "arch" and "lace"?) imply that the entire t-shirt is made out of cross-and-arch lace? If so, would "cross-and-arch-laced t-shirt" be better or should I just go with "t-shirt with cross-and-arch lace"?
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    It's actually a t-shirt decorated with cross-and-arch lace.

    Does "cross-and-arch-lace t-shirt" (do I need the hyphen between "arch" and "lace"?) imply that the entire t-shirt is made out of cross-and-arch lace? If so, would "cross-and-arch-laced t-shirt" be better or should I just go with "t-shirt with cross-and-arch lace"?
    Laced doesn't work as a verb here (although to be exact, I think it's actually a past-participle), because the verb lace has nothing to do with the noun lace that you're talking about. I don't want to confuse you, Tiphona, but the noun lace can mean either "delicate open-weave fabric used as decoration" or "a cord or string drawn through holes and used to fasten a shoe or a garment." However, the verb to lace, when applied to clothing, always means "to draw (a cord or thread) through holes, eyes, etc, as when tying shoes." And that is the image that readers will invariably get in their minds if you try to use lace as a verb.

    I know you are trying to use as few words as possible, but you have to say something like "trimmed with lace" or "lace-trimmed" (or -decorated or -embellished or a similar word). Nothing else will work, or at least nothing I can think of. How about this: "t-shirt trimmed with cross-and-arch lace"?
     
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