Cloud number nine

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boubata

Member
Algeria languages: Arabic/English/french/ some german
Dear friends,
Would you tell me what's the explanation of this sentence( cloud number nine)and its origine.
 
  • TraductoraPobleSec

    Senior Member
    Catalan & Spanish
    I've always heard Cloud Nine. Have a look at the Wiki's entry: Cloud_Nine

    I am not a native English speaker, but have the feeling it's a synonym of being in seventh heaven.

    There is, by the way, a beautiful album by George Harrison called Cloud Nine.
     

    j.jacklyn

    New Member
    English, U.S.
    boutbata,

    i am not sure of the origin, dn's link seems to be helpful for that. but, to be on "cloud nine" means you're extremely happy - having the best day ever. :eek:)
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I always assumed "cloud nine" was originally derived from Dante's Divina Commedia (yes, I know that this wasn't his title for it!), where the most exalted Sphere of the Paradiso (Heaven) was number nine, the one inhabited by the angels. (The Primum Mobile, the outermost layer of the skies except for the Empyrean Heaven, the firmament). Mind you, all these numbers and layers might vary depending on the writer.
     

    j.jacklyn

    New Member
    English, U.S.
    I always assumed "cloud nine" was originally derived from Dante's Divina Commedia (yes, I know that this wasn't his title for it!), where the most exalted Sphere of the Paradiso (Heaven) was number nine, the one inhabited by the angels. (The Primum Mobile, the outermost layer of the skies except for the Empyrean Heaven, the firmament). Mind you, all these numbers and layers might vary depending on the writer.
    That's a pretty deep interpretation! But different context.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    My Dad, (who spoke Portuguese as his first language) would always get idioms mixed up. When he would get excited about something, he would say he was floating on Cloud 13!
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, according to The Cloud-Spotter's Guide by Gavin Pretor-Pinney, in 1896 an international group of meteorologists agreed a classification of clouds into ten 'genera' of which number nine was Cumulonimbus, the tallest of all the types.

    "So," (says Pretor-Pinney) "to be on cloud nine is therefore to be on the highest one".

    Makes sense to me!

    Loob
     

    TraductoraPobleSec

    Senior Member
    Catalan & Spanish
    Well, according to The Cloud-Spotter's Guide by Gavin Pretor-Pinney, in 1896 an international group of meteorologists agreed a classification of clouds into ten 'genera' of which number nine was Cumulonimbus, the tallest of all the types.

    "So," (says Pretor-Pinney) "to be on cloud nine is therefore to be on the highest one".

    Makes sense to me!

    Loob
    Loob, this is great info! I'll have to look out for that book! The Dante explanation makes a lot of sense, though, as well.

    Best regards everyone.
     

    zhp

    Member
    China and Chinese
    Hi, what does "cloud nine" mean? Does it mean heaven?
    Can I say "He descends from cloud nine?" Thanks.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi, what does "cloud nine" mean? Does it mean heaven?
    Can I say "He descends from cloud nine?" Thanks.
    No, you wouldn't say that, Zhp. "Cloud Nine" is generally used to mean a euphoric happiness ie:

    "I was on cloud nine after I got my job promotion" OR
    "When she said 'yes' to my marriage proposal, I was on cloud nine"
     

    Orbita

    Member
    English, USA
    I agree with Dimcl. You wouldn't say "he descends from cloud nine". If you wanted to say that he's an amazing person with wonderful qualitites, you might say something like, "he's straight from heaven" or "he's an angel".
     
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