'cloudy nature' of the case

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LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
In a sign of the cloudy nature of the case, the prosecutor, Mazar Fortil, decided not to pursue what could have been the most serious charge against the group, that of trafficking---taken from the NYT
Dear all,

I have trouble with "cloudy nature". Is it an idiom to say the case is obscure or hard to predict? Could you please clear it up? Thanks.


LQZ
 
  • MmeFarrand

    Member
    English- USA
    Hi LQZ.
    From what I can tell, here "cloudy nature" means unclear, not simple or clear-cut. I wouldn't go so far as to use the word obscure because it connotes something strange or out of the ordinary (in addition to unclear, etc.). I don't think I would quite call this phrase an idiom, but either way, since "nature" refers to the case's characteristics (like a person's nature), by calling its nature cloudy, the writer likens the case's nature to a cloudy, unclear day.
    Hope this helps.

    -SMF
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Hi LQZ.
    From what I can tell, here "cloudy nature" means unclear, not simple or clear-cut. I wouldn't go so far as to use the word obscure because it connotes something strange or out of the ordinary (in addition to unclear, etc.). I don't think I would quite call this phrase an idiom, but either way, since "nature" refers to the case's characteristics (like a person's nature), by calling its nature cloudy, the writer likens the case's nature to a cloudy, unclear day.
    Hope this helps.

    -SMF
    Thanks, I've got it. :)
     
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