coûter une blinde

TRIBEN

Member
French
Hi!

"Je peux pas rester trop longtemps au telephone avec toi, ca me coute une blinde"

Means:
"I can't stay too long on the phone with you, it is really expensive"

But it is really expensive does not satisfy me at all.
I want something colloquial (not vulgar) to render the french.

I thought of it is mad expensive for east coast of AE but any suggestions is more than welcome
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    With slang like this you'll probably have to decide what your target audience is (the most important thing is to keep it consistent). In my part of the world we'd say "it's costing me an arm and a leg". I don't know if that idiom is ok for other varieties of English.
     
    Last edited:

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    With slang like this you'll probably have to decide what your target audience is:tick: (the most important thing is to keep it consistent). In my part of the world we'd say "it's costing me an arm and a leg". I don't know if that idiom is ok for other varieties of English.
    We use "to cost an arm and a leg" in AE as well.
    I have never come across "coûter une blinde" before, but it is listed in online dictionaries with the meaning "ça coûte très cher."
    (Out of curiosity, I wonder if anyone can confirm that "blinde" is indeed a poker term, as SergueiL suggests and, if so, do you know what it is in English?)

    ...I thought of it is mad expensive for east coast of AE:confused:
    Do you perhaps mean "wicked" expensive?
    "Wicked" is used in some New England states to mean "very."
     

    Martyn94

    Banned
    English
    In my part of the world, we say the same thing.
    "It's costing me a fortune" is idiomatic (at least in BE) and a bit less elaborate. It would be my normal choice, though I also use "an arm and a leg" where more emphasis is needed.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks, Martyn94, for teaching me a new poker term!:)

    It seems to confirm that "blind" here is a poker metaphor.
    Actually, no. On the corresponding French-language page, the term is spelled "blind" (no "e").
    So my question still remains: Que veut dire "blinde" ?
     

    Martyn94

    Banned
    English
    Thanks, Martyn94, for teaching me a new poker term!:)


    Actually, no. On the corresponding French-language page, the term is spelled "blind" (no "e").
    So my question still remains: Que veut dire "blinde" ?
    An archaic word for timbers used to shore up excavations, which doesn't seem relevant here. Reverso also gives "blind" in the poker sense - I don't think that you can expect borrowed words like this to be spelt with perfect consistency.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    An archaic word for timbers used to shore up excavations, which doesn't seem relevant here.
    Yes, thanks. I just found something describing them as boards used on roofs.
    Maybe at one time they were very expensive???
    I guess I should have been more specific in phrasing my question.
    I'm wondering if anyone out there knows for certain the meaning of "une blinde" as it is used in "coûter une blinde."
    Reverso also gives "blind" in the poker sense - I don't think that you can expect borrowed words like this to be spelt with perfect consistency.
    True!:)
     

    TRIBEN

    Member
    French
    Thanks guys!

    To "language hound" I really meant mad and not wicked.
    Never heard wicked here in NYC, maybe I don't listen good enough or maybe they don't use it that much here.

    I have no clue where "blinde" comes from and is used in so many slang phrases but it is definitely used widely:
    aller a toute blinde: going flat out
    etre blindé de tune: being filthy rich
    se blinder: protect your back (proteger ses arrieres)
    etre blindé: to be harden

    I do think it has nothing to do with poker which is a really new trend and these phrases were used by my grand pa, we never know poker has maybe a role but I just doubt it.

    Thanks again! :)
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks for the info, TRIBEN, and for adding a new expression to my repertoire.:)
    To "language hound" I really meant mad and not wicked.
    Never heard wicked here in NYC, maybe I don't listen good enough or maybe they don't use it that much here.
    "It's mad expensive" sounds very British to my American ear.
    I would expect "It's crazy expensive" in AE.
    "It's wicked expensive" is something you hear in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine. You wouldn't normally hear it in New York.

    As for your sentence I can't stay too long on the phone with you, it is really expensive,
    I personally would say "I can't stay on the phone too long ["with you" is understood] or "I can't talk too long,"
    it's costing me a fortune or
    it's costing me an arm and a leg.
     

    TRIBEN

    Member
    French
    it's costing me a fortune
    and
    it's costing me an arm and a leg

    are great and I will use them non stop now (yes, everything is so expensive around here)

    And thank you for the "mad expensive" that sounds british, I sound already french so I will try to use american slang/dialect and not confuse people with weird constructions...

    ;-)
     

    betle

    Member
    English-NY,USA; Spanish-Lima,PE
    it's costing me a fortune
    and
    it's costing me an arm and a leg

    are great and I will use them non stop now (yes, everything is so expensive around here)

    And thank you for the "mad expensive" that sounds british, I sound already french so I will try to use american slang/dialect and not confuse people with weird constructions...

    ;-)

    Hi Triben, I know this won't help you, I'm kinda late, but I just had to put my 2 cents in - I grew up in NYC and we'd use 'mad expensive' A LOT, I still hear it every now and then. I don't know about NY-State as a whole, but many NYC folk would definitely understand it. 'Mad expensive' may also be a generational thing.
     

    TRIBEN

    Member
    French
    Never too late to get better :)

    Thanks, you just confirmed I am not crazy and I do hear that every now and again.
     

    Tochka

    Senior Member
    Hi Triben, I know this won't help you, I'm kinda late, but I just had to put my 2 cents in - I grew up in NYC and we'd use 'mad expensive' A LOT, I still hear it every now and then. I don't know about NY-State as a whole, but many NYC folk would definitely understand it. 'Mad expensive' may also be a generational thing.
    Yes. AE/BE (and regions with in them) is one area of division, but generational usage is another one to keep in mind.
    The expression to "cost an arm and a leg" may be on the way out. While I would certainly use it naturally, I don't believe it's in use much anymore among younger adults.
    As for "mad expensive", I haven't heard that one. On the other hand, I have heard "wicked" used as an intensifier, but I associate it with younger speakers.
     
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