Co-responsible?

danieleriksson

New Member
Swedish, Sweden
I want to be able to say that I was co-responsible for a thing, e.g. "I was co-responsible for the company's internal annual conference," but that's not an accepted word in standard English, right? So how should I phrase it instead?
 
  • danieleriksson

    New Member
    Swedish, Sweden
    OK, I've obviously not yet mastered the search function here; somehow I didn't find that. Thank you, and my apologies.
     

    danieleriksson

    New Member
    Swedish, Sweden
    Though if I read that thread correctly, we're asking two different questions? The other person is, in fact, not sharing the responsibility.
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    In order to tell you how to phrase it, it is first necessary that you describe exactly what it is you are trying to express. In this case, who is responsible for what?
     

    danieleriksson

    New Member
    Swedish, Sweden
    "The other person" was referring to the person who asked the question in the other linked thread. I just realised that wasn't very clear. My apologies, again.
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I wouldn't; I don't think there is such a word, and it reminds me too much of a co-respondent in an old-fashioned divorce case!

    I would say "I had equal responsibility for organizing the event", or "Jane and I had joint responsibility for the conference.
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    It is fashionable at the moment to use 'co-' as a suffix. I recently saw a new healthcare complex advertised as having 'minor centres co-located with the main hospital'. It is quite common in corporate contexts to invent new words by adding prefixes or by turning nouns into verbs, or both. So 'co-responsible' is definitely something a native English speaker might say in this kind of context. But it's always dangerous to play around with things like this if English isn't your native language so I think the above suggestions are better. Tbh corporate jargon can sound quite silly at times even when it's entirely idiomatic within a given context. For example I might say I can 'uniquely mesh resource-leveling infomediaries' and be praised by my corporate colleagues, but it looks like gobledegook to most people.
     
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