co-starring/featuring/casting

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peter199083

Senior Member
Mandarin
The three words in the post title are often seen in the movies or TV programs. And they make no differences to me at all. All I can tell is that they're always followed the actors/actresses who participate in the performance. Can you help me distinguish them?
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The star of a movie is the lead actor, the one with the most important role.

    When two or more actors have equally important roles, they are called co-stars. Daniel Craig and Harrison Ford co-star in the recent Cowboys and Aliens.

    A featured actor is someone with a smaller part but who is important enough that the producers want to mention his or her name. This might be a person who is well-known for reasons other than acting but who appears in this movie. If there is a remake of The Wizard of Oz, it might be advertised with "Featuring: Bill Clinton as the Wizard." (This is a small part in the movie, despite its title.)

    The cast includes everyone who has a role, other than extras. (Extras are, for example, people eating in the background in a restaurant scene or walking around in a railroad station. Extras generally do not speak. If they do, it is only a few words.)

    The decision about who to call what often depends on factors other than the size of the part. An actor's stature, his or her ability to demand certain contract terms, and the studio's sense of which names will help bring people to see the movie, are all considered here.
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    featuring = we want to call special attention to this actor/actress
    co-starring = actors/actresses of equal importance who appear together in the film
    casting = the process of choosing the actors to be in the film

    Hope that helps! :)
     

    peter199083

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    featuring = we want to call special attention to this actor/actress
    co-starring = actors/actresses of equal importance who appear together in the film
    casting = the process of choosing the actors to be in the film

    Hope that helps! :)
    Thank you both!
    Miss Julie, no offense, I believe you just perceived 'casting' as 'auditioning' in your mind.
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    Thank you both!
    Miss Julie, no offense, I believe you just perceived 'casting' as 'auditioning' in your mind.
    I did nothing of the sort. To "cast" is also a verb that refers to the process of choosing actors for a film, movie, TV show, etc. The ACTORS audition; the CASTING DIRECTOR chooses the actors he/she wants.
     
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    peter199083

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I did nothing of the sort. To "cast" is also a verb that refers to the process of choosing actors for a film, movie, TV show, etc. The ACTORS audition; the CASTING DIRECTOR chooses the actors he/she wants.
    Pardon my ignorance.:)
    Let me summarize a bit:
    A director CASTS actors while
    an actor CASTS a film.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Getting closer!
    The list of actors in the film is called "The cast"
    The person who decides who will be in the film is "The casting director" (they will get advice from others).
    The casting director is the one who "casts" actors in a given role.
    The director directs the film. Actors act in the film.
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    No, no, no! Actors are cast in a process which involves many people, principally the casting specialist who puts forward suggestions to the film's director for the final decision. Also, the film's stars may have a say in who they are willing to act with. We say an actor 'is cast' in a film (passive tense), because he/she has been chosen for his/her role. Much as an actor would like to cast him/herself, this never happens!
     

    peter199083

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Finnally, I GET IT!
    My prior understanding was that 'to cast' was 'to act', partly because what often goes into my ears are like 'casting staff','acting staff','cast' which I absolutely mixed up. Thanks to your explications, I can distinguish those two words now.
     
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    kengwilson

    Senior Member
    English from the North of England
    I can distinguish those two words now.
    Better: "I can distinuish between those two words now."

    Or use the word "differentiate" - which in my experience is much underused by non-native users of English.

    KGW
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Differentiate" is better.

    I can distinguish between two Czech words that are spelled differently, as those under discussion are, because I can tell that the letters are not the same. I can't differentiate between them, however, because I don't speak Czech so I would have no idea what they mean. I recognize the difference, but I don't understand it.

    I can differentiate between most pairs of common English words. That means I understand the difference between them.
     

    peter199083

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thank you all very much indeed!
    Now I can differentiate between both two pairs of words respectively-cast vs. act and distinguish vs. differentiate.
     
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