Coca-Cola into Coke, bicycle into bike?

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Ocham

Senior Member
Japanese
Was "bicycle" shortened into "bike" in the same way "Coca-Cola" was shortened into "Coke" or vice versa?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    From Etymology Online: bike: bike (n.) 1882, American English, shortened and altered form of bicycle.

    From Wikipedia: Coke History: In 1886, when Atlanta and Fulton County passed prohibition legislation, Pemberton responded by developing Coca-Cola, essentially a nonalcoholic version of French Wine Coca. The first sales were at Jacob's Pharmacy in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 8, 1886.

    But 1886 is only when Coca-Cola appeared. There is no mention on Wikipedia or on Coke's own history page as to when the word Coke showed up to the party, although they note this:
    Fast forward [from 1887] to the 1970s when Coca-Cola's advertising started to reflect a brand connected with fun, friends and good times. Many fondly remember the 1971 Hilltop Singers performing "I'd Like to Buy the World a Coke", or the 1979 "Have a Coke and a Smile" commercial featuring a young fan giving Pittsburgh Steeler, "Mean Joe Greene", a refreshing bottle of Coca-Cola.
     
    Last edited:

    Ocham

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I have a clearer understanding now. I knew BIKE and COKE have phonologically nothing in common.

    Special thanks to Copyright.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    From Etymology Online: bike: bike (n.) 1882, American English, shortened and altered form of bicycle
    Why did you stop looking there? :confused:
    From Etymology Online:
    coke: shortened form of cocaine, 1908, American English.
    Coke: soft drink, 1909, shortening of brand name Coca-Cola.
    One of the original ingredients of Coca-cola was coca leaves, the source of cocaine. (The other part of the name is from another ingredient - the kola nut.)
     
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