cocktail party

rzezucha

Senior Member
polish
What does this expression refer to in this contex? Simply, what does it mean, how do you understand it?
"Patterns are formed by the ensemble of neurons as they rise into activity, respond to each other and to environmental stimuli, and then fade away, creating a "cocktail party" of chatter in the brain".
 
  • teksch

    Senior Member
    English - American
    What does this expression refer to in this contex? Simply, what does it mean, how do you understand it?
    "Patterns are formed by the ensemble of neurons as they rise into activity, respond to each other and to environmental stimuli, and then fade away, creating a "cocktail party" of chatter in the brain".
    Imagine that you are at a gathering of people at a party. Alcohol is served and some people are talking loudly and others are quieter. You are near some of the people and far away from others. People talk to other people and then move on to talk to even more people. There is not just one speaker as would be the case in a formal lecture. At this party there would be a din of noises some near and some far, some understandable and some incoherent.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Imagine a cocktail party. Each participant listens to all kinds of things, is provoked by all kinds of external interests and stimuli, and speaks in response to all of this, so influencing all of those who are aware consciously or subconsciously of what is said.

    Your brain consists of many, many neurons that are richly interconnected internally and to external stimuli. Each is excited to varying degrees by others with which it is connected and the external stimuli. In response, it too generates input to others. Altogether this is a hubbub of activity that ebbs and flows across your brain, increasing and decreasing in level of activity and somehow representing thought.

    The writer is using the chatter in a cocktail party as an analogy to help us understand something of the mystery of brain activity.
     
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