cocktail

marcdid

New Member
French
Hi everybody,

Could you please tell me if the expression "cocktail of news" makes sense? The idea I would like to express is that the content of a newspaper I am working on is a mix of different news...I do not know if the association of the words "cocktail" and "news" is weird or not, this would be the title of a section?
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hi Marc. Not particularly weird, no. Some people might question your good taste in using a term as 'frivolous' as cocktail with something as (generally) serious as news, so you might be better off with a more neutral term like mix or assortment or (erm...) something else.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hello,

    Is it possible to use "cocktail" literarily in the sense of "mixture"? Would the following self-made example sound idiomatic to you if you came across it in a novel?

    "The child looked up at the woman with a cocktail of fear and innocence."
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    No, that just doesn't have the right tone (in my opinion).
    Thanks for the reply.

    I occasionally post texts on Facebook, and I'm very careful in picking up the correct word. In spite of that, as I scrolled through my old posts, I spotted a text in which I used "cocktail" in place of "mixture" in a literary sense. Back then, I must have definitely checked it out. Ironically, I now fail to find examples on the Internet apart from the one in Oxford Learner's Dictionary:

    "The show was a heady cocktail of jazz and political satire."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "The show was a heady cocktail of jazz and political satire."
    That one's okay. Maybe because you are "consuming" the jazz and the satire and so there's an analogy to consuming an alcoholic drink.

    You aren't consuming fear and innocence.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I agree with Kentix: a cocktail of fear and innocence sounds very odd; a cocktail of jazz and political satire sounds fine.
    To Kentix's 'for consumption' idea I'd add the idea that literal cocktails are things deliberately made by human hand:)
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I agree with Kentix: a cocktail of fear and innocence sounds very odd; a cocktail of jazz and political satire sounds fine.
    To Kentix's 'for consumption' idea I'd add the idea that literal cocktails are things deliberately made by human hand:)
    Thanks for the reply. I’ll bear it in mind :)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    And on the positive side, AIDS sufferers were treated for many years with a "cocktail of drugs", so it does not always have to be illegal or lethal.

    HAART for HIV: Understanding Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    In 1995, a combination drug treatment known as the “AIDS cocktail” was introduced. This type of therapy is now known as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). It’s also called combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) or simply antiretroviral therapy (ART).
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    To Kentix's 'for consumption' idea I'd add the idea that literal cocktails are things deliberately made by human hand:)
    :thumbsup:

    That's an excellent point. Cocktails (of all kinds) are purposefully mixed. A cocktail of fear and innocence is not.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "The child looked up at the woman with a cocktail of fear and innocence."
    "Cocktail" does not quite work for me in this instance. My first instinct is to go with "combination".

    "The child looked up at the woman with a cocktail combination of fear and innocence."

    "Blend" could also work if the two concepts were actually blended together and were not just two separate emotions.

    "The child looked up at the woman with a cocktail blend of fear and innocence."

    or finally (and my preferred version)

    "The child looked up at the woman with a cocktail of both fear and innocence."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top