coconut <flesh><meat>

jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
Coconut milk comes from coconut "flesh" or "meat".

Are they both correct? If so, which is better in colloquial English? Thank you!
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Coconut meat sounds totally weird to me. But that’s probably because (according to Oxford), it’s a North American usage.



    cross-posted
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Ah. Checking the WRF dictionaries, I see that Collins doesn't include nutmeat.

    Random House Learner's:

    nut•meat /ˈnʌtˌmit/ n. [countable]
    1. Plant Biology, Food: the kernel of a nut, usually one that can be eaten.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Both are correct and in Britain they are used equally. In America, however, "coconut meat" is ten times more likely.
    Thank you Keith. I guess "watermelon meat" is also much more common than "watermelon flesh" in AmE. Am I right?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I'd imagine "flesh" is the term used in all varieties of English to refer to the edible portion of a watermelon. It sounds very odd to me to hear "meat" used to refer to the inside of a fruit, though I suppose it could work with coconuts.
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Usually people speak in a way that avoids referring to watermelon as flesh (or meat!). They just say watermelon. If you give me a sentence about watermelon, I will do my best to put it in idiomatic Am-E.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I've never heard of coconut meat let alone watermelon meat! I might say the fleshy bit of the watermelon if I wanted to contrast it to the rind.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Usually people speak in a way that avoids referring to watermelon as flesh (or meat!). They just say watermelon. If you give me a sentence about watermelon, I will do my best to put it in idiomatic Am-E.
    Thank you all!
    If I see a kid who ate a slice of watermelon and left a lot of flesh part, can I say "please eat clear, there is still a lot of "flesh" or "meat" left". Which is more appropriate?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No one would use either of those words in casual conversation. They’d probably just say “Don’t waste any of it”.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    In earlier English (say pre 1800), flesh and meat were both also used to mean "food unrelated to meat". They were used for "the edible part" of anything that was naturally edible.

    We still use "flesh" in this context occasionally: "The flesh of the apple was rather dry." However, I would advise a student against using either.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If I see a kid who ate a slice of watermelon and left a lot of flesh part, can I say "please eat clear, there is still a lot of "flesh" or "meat" left". Which is more appropriate?
    There is still a lot of watermelon on the rind.
    ("Please eat clear." makes no sense.)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I would call it "watermelon pulp".
    That would be correct according to what the dictionaries say, but for me personally the word carries a strong association with having been crushed, mashed, or beaten, and so I would avoid using the term to describe stuff that is still firm.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    That would be correct according to what the dictionaries say, but for me personally the word carries a strong association with having been crushed, mashed, or beaten, and so I would avoid using the term to describe stuff that is still firm.
    Same here. The first definition in Oxford is
    A soft, wet, shapeless mass of material.
    ‘boiling with soda will reduce your peas to pulp’

    pulp | Definition of pulp in English by Lexico Dictionaries
     
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