Cod "stocks (vs a stock)" in the North Atlantic

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brighthope

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi,
According to Longman American English Dictionary, the word "stock" has a meaning below.

"[C(=countable)]the total amount of something in a particular area that is available to be used"
*Cod stocks in the North Atlantic have dropped radically.

(my question starts here)
If "stock" is countable and it means "the total amount of something", shouldn't it be "the cod stock in the North Atlantic" or "A stock of cods in the North Atlantic"?

If "stocks" means "stock + stock + stock..." and one stock is "the total amount of something in a particular area", I understand "Cod stocks" as the total numbers of cods in many areas. (the amount/numbers of Cods in area A and the amount/numbers of cods in area B and....)

But this sentence clearly talks about the amount/numbers of cods in the North Atlantic.

I'm a bit confused.
Thank you.
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    One of the meanings of the word "idiom" is
    1 a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g. over the moon).
    The set expression is "Cod (or other fish) stocks are ..."

    Not all things in English usage conform to strict rules.
     

    brighthope

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    The set expression is "Cod (or other fish) stocks are ..."

    Not all things in English usage conform to strict rules.
    Hi, thanks for your reply. I now understand it is a set expression. Does this apply only to fish? Or the word "stock" in this meaning is usually only used for fish?

    Usually this dictionary (Longman American) is good at showing idiomatic expressions by making them bold, but in this case it didn't so I never thought it was a set expression!
     
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