coeducational<mixed> mixed-gender school

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Joseph A

Senior Member
Kurdish
Hello everyone,
Could you tell me if either term "coeducational or mixed or mixed-gender school" common and natural in English? For example, I teach students at a school named "Venice". At this school, both genders are housed in the same school building and attend the classes together. When I set questions for them, I write either "coeducational, mixed, or mixed-gender" on the question papers follows:
1. School: Venice coeducational high school
Or
2. School: Venice mixed-gender high school
Or
3. School: Venice mixed secondary school
I think #1 and #2 are common and natural. That's my opinion
PS. Do you have some other alternatives, please?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Coeducational" (or "co-ed") is what we normally say in the US. "Mixed-gender" makes sense but I've never heard it used in that kind of context.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In BE, coeducational is the current term, although, as the vast majority of schools are coeducational, the default "Venice High School" would strongly imply "Venice Coeducational High School"
    2. School: Venice mixed-gender high school :cross:
    3. School: Venice Mixed Secondary School. This was relatively common up until about 1970. It is no longer used.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    "Coeducational" (or "co-ed") is what we normally say in the US. "Mixed-gender" makes sense but I've never heard it used in that kind of context.
    Thanks a lot, The Newt.
    In BE, coeducational is the current term, although, as the vast majority of schools are coeducational, the default "Venice High School" would strongly imply "Venice Coeducational High School"
    2. School: Venice mixed-gender high school :cross:
    3. School: Venice Mixed Secondary School. This was relatively common up until about 1970. It is no longer used.
    Thank you, PaulQ.
    I think you put a cross against #3 not #2. Is it right?
    PS. I understood now. You put a cross against "2".
    What is the official name of the school? Unless one of these terms is in the name, I don't see any reason to include it on your question papers.
    Thank you, heypresto.
    I don't know what you mean by "the official name...". I didn't mention the name of my school because I thought it would confuse you. We use names of cities and places and famous people to name schools. That's why I thought "Venice" is the best one to use instead.
    Venice High School
    Thanks a lot again, PaulQ.
     
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    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't know what you mean by "the official name...".
    The actual name is not relevant. I was suggesting using the name of the school (whatever it is) on your papers. If it doesn't contain one of the terms you are asking about, there's no reason to include one of these terms on your papers.

    If, for instance, the school is called 'XYZ High School', that's its official name.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I think you put a cross against #3 not #2. Is it right?
    No. I marked it correctly - there is no mistake:
    2. School: Venice mixed-gender high school :cross: This is simply wrong. Do not use it.
    3. School: Venice Mixed Secondary School. This was relatively common up until about 1970. It is no longer used.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    The actual name is not relevant. I was suggesting using the name of the school (whatever it is) on your papers. If it doesn't contain one of the terms you are asking about, there's no reason to include one of these terms on your papers.

    If, for instance, the school is called 'XYZ High School', that's its official name.
    Thanks a lot, heypresto.
    In my country, some schools are "coeducational" some others are "single-sex", that's why we should make this distinction using thes terms.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, I think it's very unusual in English-speaking places to have Co-educational as part of the name. You are more likely to have it as part of the description: The Scots College is a co-educational institution. However, it is more common for single-sex schools to indicate their status: St Hilda's Girls' School.

    However, if it is normal in your country to have Co-educational as part of the name, you should include it.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    No. I marked it correctly - there is no mistake:
    2. School: Venice mixed-gender high school :cross: This is simply wrong. Do not use it.
    3. School: Venice Mixed Secondary School. This was relatively common up until about 1970. It is no longer used.
    Thanks a lot, PaulQ.
    Yes, I think it's very unusual in English-speaking places to have Co-educational as part of the name. You are more likely to have it as part of the description: The Scots College is a co-educational institution. However, it is more common for single-sex schools to indicate their status: St Hilda's Girls' School.

    However, if it is normal in your country to have Co-educational as part of the name, you should include it.
    Thanks a lot, natkretep.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    100% of public high schools are co-educational here (as far as I know) so it's nothing we ever think about or have words for. Private high schools that are single sex probably exist. But the default everywhere is co-educational schools so it's not worth mentioning.

    At the college level as recently as the '60s and '70s single sex institutions were common (and some still exist) but it generally isn't part of their name. Radcliffe College was a women's college but it didn't say that in their name. Smith College still is at the undergraduate level.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    100% of public high schools are co-educational here (as far as I know) so it's nothing we ever think about or have words for. Private high schools that are single sex probably exist. But the default everywhere is co-educational schools so it's not worth mentioning.
    There are single-sex private secondary schools in New York City, but they don't include the sex of the student in their names: Brearley School, Spence School, and Marymount School of New York are girls' schools.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    100% of public high schools are co-educational here (as far as I know) so it's nothing we ever think about or have words for. Private high schools that are single sex probably exist. But the default everywhere is co-educational schools so it's not worth mentioning.

    At the college level as recently as the '60s and '70s single sex institutions were common (and some still exist) but it generally isn't part of their name. Radcliffe College was a women's college but it didn't say that in their name. Smith College still is at the undergraduate level.
    Thanks a lot.
    I noticed that whenever you used the term, you hyphenated it like this "co-educational". Isn't it as common as its version without the hyphen? I consulted the Google Nram Viewer. According to it, the hyphenated version is less common. However, I can't depend entirely on The Ngram Viewer.
    There are single-sex private secondary schools in New York City, but they don't include the sex of the student in their names: Brearley School, Spence School, and Marymount School of New York are girls' schools.
    Thanks a lot.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't know if either is "right". I just did what I was in the mood for. Another day or in another place I might leave out the hyphen. I just didn't have time to worry about it so when I unconsciously included the hyphen the first time I made sure to include it the second time.

    Edited: Removed stray question mark.
     
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    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    I don't know if either is "right"? I just did what I was in the mood for. Another day or in another place I might leave out the hyphen. I just didn't have time to worry about it so when I unconsciously included the hyphen the first time I made sure to include it the second time.
    Thanks a lot.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    In my country, some schools are "coeducational" some others are "single-sex", that's why we should make this distinction using thes terms.
    In the UK, a decreasing number of schools are single-sex, and those which are generally have 'boys' or 'girls' as part of their official name.

    If you're asking/writing about somewhere where that isn't the case, I'd use the word 'Mixed'. A school is commonly referred to as 'co-educational', but they don't (or didn't) generally have that as part of their name.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    In the UK, a decreasing number of schools are single-sex, and those which are generally have 'boys' or 'girls' as part of their official name.

    If you're asking/writing about somewhere where that isn't the case, I'd use the word 'Mixed'. A school is commonly referred to as 'co-educational', but they don't (or didn't) generally have that as part of their name.
    Thanks a lot, DonnyB.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    At this school, both genders are housed in the same school building and attend the classes together.
    When you say "housed" do you mean that the students live at the school? They stay there overnight and weekends?

    In the US, that is called a "boarding school", and is not very common. No public schools (before college level) are boarding schools, so all the boarding schools are private schools. Many boarding schools are single-gender.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    When you say "housed" do you mean that the students live at the school? They stay there overnight and weekends?

    In the US, that is called a "boarding school", and is not very common. No public schools (before college level) are boarding schools, so all the boarding schools are private schools. Many boarding schools are single-gender.
    Thanks.
    I learned something new from you. 98% of the schools in my country are public not private. I talked about public schools. Here, some of the publuc schools are coeducational and some others are single-gender. I think I used "housed" incorrectly. No, they neither stay there overnight nor do they live there. They just study there. After finish classes each day, all of them go home. By "housed", I meant both genders study at the same school and attend the classes together.
     
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    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    BE differs from AE in its naming of schools.
    BE
    Public school - a school that requires parents to pay large fees so that their child may study there. These are also known as private schools.
    State school - these schools are free: anyone may send their child to a state school.

    A public school is more likely to also be a boarding school.
    A boarding school is more likely to be single-sex - i.e. for boys or for girls, but not both.
    It is rare for a state school to be a boarding school - there are only 40 of these in the UK: List of state boarding schools in England and Wales - Wikipedia
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    BE differs from AE in its naming of schools.
    BE
    Public school - a school that requires parents to pay large fees so that their child may study there. These are also known as private schools.
    State school - these schools are free: anyone may send their child to a state school.

    A public school is more likely to also be a boarding school.
    A boarding school is more likely to be single-sex - i.e. for boys or for girls, but not both.
    It is rare for a state school to be a boarding school - there are only 40 of these in the UK: List of state boarding schools in England and Wales - Wikipedia
    Thanks a lot.
    Again, it is new information for me. According to your explanation, 98% of the schools here are "state schools". I googled "public schools" and found out that they are "funded by the government and parents don't pay any money so that their children will study there". Until now, I have used the term "public" to mean the one that Google describes or defines.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I googled "public schools" and found out that they are "funded by the government and parents don't pay any money so that their children will study there".
    Yes. That is the AE meaning. Public = free; private = you pay.
    As you see, the BE meaning is quite different: State = free; Public/private = you pay.
     
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