coffee shop, cafe, café [AE, BE]

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Keith Bradford

Senior Member
English (Midlands UK)
<< Mod note: This discussion was split from okay -used in cafes >>

In the sort of café that calls white coffee "a latte", any form of language might well be tolerated. In a real restaurant, I would expect the waiter/waitress to say "Certainly, sir" or "Of course you may".
 
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  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    In the sort of café that calls white coffee "a latte", any form of language might well be tolerated. In a real restaurant, I would expect the waiter/waitress to say "Certainly, sir" or "Of course you may".
    Spoken like a real tea drinker. Do you not distinguish between a coffee shop and a cafe and a restaurant? The growth of coffee culture has clearly passed you by - or perhaps vice versa:D

    << Response to question of other thread. >>
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I think it would be a barista, not a cashier, who would be producing your coffee.
    Now that's a proper coffee shop:D

    I think the question in the OP is still valid even if the cashier goes to the barista and adds to their order list.
    << Comment in other thread. >>
     
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    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Spoken like a real tea drinker. Do you not distinguish between a coffee shop and a cafe and a restaurant? The growth of coffee culture has clearly passed you by - or perhaps vice versa ....

    On the contrary, I'm an extremely keen coffee drinker. I just don't see why I'm required to ask for it in Italian when I'm talking to a Polish waiter in an American cafe chain in Britain. Pretentious or what? :rolleyes:

    (Perhaps not strictly on topic, but perhaps interesting for foreign readers of this thread, interested in current linguistic usage.)
     
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    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    On the contrary, I'm an extremely keen coffee drinker. I just don't see why I'm required to ask for it in Italian when I'm talking to a Polish waiter in an American cafe chain in Britain.
    Especially if the cafe chain doesn't pay taxes!
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In the sort of café that calls white coffee "a latte", any form of language might well be tolerated. In a real restaurant, I would expect the waiter/waitress to say "Certainly, sir" or "Of course you may".
    (A white coffee [brewed coffee with cream or milk] and a latte [espresso with steamed milk] are actually two different things, prepared two different ways. The difference is as striking to those who care as the difference between good tea and a bag of Lipton's. :) )

    << Comment in other thread. >>
     
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    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    An American cafe is a restaurant, not a coffee shop.


    :thumbsdown::thumbsdown::thumbsdown:
    Keith was referring to an American-owned cafe IN BRITAIN and as such is NOT a restaurant.

    Restaurants serve meals, often with meat and fish dishes for example.

    The kind of place Keith was talking about serves coffee, cakes, pastries and things like that.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Keith was referring to an American-owned cafe IN BRITAIN and as such is NOT a restaurant.
    I know what he meant but he said it in a confusing way. An American-style cafe is a restaurant. Starbucks is not a cafe in American English. In American English, "cafe" is totally unrelated to "coffee."
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    :thumbsdown::thumbsdown::thumbsdown:
    Restaurants serve meals, often with meat and fish dishes for example.
    Yes. In the U.S. an American-owned café would also serve meals, often with meat and fish dishes. A café in the U.S. is a casual restaurant.

    The kind of place Keith was talking about serves coffee, cakes, pastries and things like that.
    This is called a coffee house or a coffee shop in American English. "Coffee house" is a little clearer, in my opinion, because old-style American coffee shops also served meals while a coffee house is expected to have only sandwiches and salads, along with cakes, pastries and things like that. It's just another one of those differences between the two varieties of English.

    Notably, Starbucks refer to their locations as "coffeehouses", not cafés.
     
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