Coffled together by wire of purest gold

october15

Senior Member
Portugal-Portuguese
#1
Slaves coffled together by wire of purest gold threaded through their earglobes.

I really don't get it.

This dipicts a pannel (among others). I assume this was not exactly how the slaves were coffled together.

Is it me, or is this impossible? By wire of purest gold?

Help!

october15
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    #2
    Hi october15

    There's at least one mistake in your transcription, and probably more than one:)

    "Earglobes" should read "earlobes".

    As for "coffled", I'm really not sure: maybe "coupled"?

    Could you please check the original text?
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    #3
    Moderator note:

    Please give your questions meaningful titles that refer to the topic, not general ones like "difficult question".

    I have renamed this thread "Coffled together by wire of purest gold".
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    #5
    A coffle is a train of beasts or slaves, so coffled would mean chained or tied together like animals or slaves. The slaves were linked to one another by pure gold wires threaded through their earlobes. As bizarre as this might sound, it is quite possible.
     
    English-England
    #7
    It's the most efficient way to explain that the wire was made from the most pure gold, without compromising the structure or flow of the sentence.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    #8
    It's the most efficient way to explain that the wire was made from the most pure gold, without compromising the structure or flow of the sentence.
    I stand by my characterization of the statement as "poetic." However efficient, I wouldn't write that sort of phrase unless I was deliberately trying to achieve a certain effect.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    #9
    Here is a link to the SOURCE.

    The elaborate language supports Bibliolept's reading, in this instance, at least. For example, the paragraph from which the title sentence was taken begins:
    Alleluias echoed from the host of trumpets and psalteries that flocked and perched around the roof beams.​
     

    october15

    Senior Member
    Portugal-Portuguese
    #10
    Hi october15

    There's at least one mistake in your transcription, and probably more than one:)

    "Earglobes" should read "earlobes".

    As for "coffled", I'm really not sure: maybe "coupled"?

    Could you please check the original text?
    I'm sorry. It is earlobes. (oops). As for "coffled" that's the exact word. Slaves were coffled together in lines.

    october15
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    #11
    I don't see any difficulty with the expression "purest gold".
    The gold that constitutes the stuff that most of us wear is not pure gold.
    In my case, it is a mere 37.5% gold.
    Some of MrsP's stuff is 75% gold.
    I don't think we own anything that is 100% gold. It is too soft for practical use, but it would be OK in this particular context.
     
    USA - English
    #13
    The sentence is a description of an elaborate carved relief on the walls of a baroque church. In these circumstances, using gold wire instead of real iron shackles makes more sense.
     

    october15

    Senior Member
    Portugal-Portuguese
    #14
    The sentence is a description of an elaborate carved relief on the walls of a baroque church. In these circumstances, using gold wire instead of real iron shackles makes more sense.
    Hum... that's more like it.
    I remember seeing a doc about those pannels and the idea crossed my mind. Yet it is kind of weird. Slaves were chained together by their feet...

    Thanks.

    october15
     
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