cogitate

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Hi. I just want to know what preposition/s usually go/es with the famous verb COGITATE.

That's to say, if you want to say "reflexionar sobre algo", how would one translate it using cogitate?:

to cogitate on sth ?
to cogitate over sth ?
to cogitate about sth ?
to cogitate sth ?

regards
 
  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Henrik Larsson said:
    Hi. I just want to know what preposition/s usually go/es with the famous verb COGITATE.

    That's to say, if you want to say "reflexionar sobre algo", how would one translate it using cogitate?:

    to cogitate on sth ?
    to cogitate over sth ?
    to cogitate about sth ?
    to cogitate sth ?

    regards
    I think the translation could be "meditar", "meditar profundamente".
    This is a formal word. It is "to cogitate about/on something"

    Cheers!
     

    El Estudiante

    Senior Member
    EEUU, english
    Hi,

    I think the most common choice is "cogitate on something", but occasionaly you also see "over" or "about". Also, you can just "cogitate" without an object.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Henrik Larsson said:
    Hi. I just want to know what preposition/s usually go/es with the famous verb COGITATE.

    That's to say, if you want to say "reflexionar sobre algo", how would one translate it using cogitate?:

    to cogitate on sth ?
    to cogitate over sth ?
    to cogitate about sth ?
    to cogitate sth ?

    regards
    Henrik, I hope you are being sarcastic here :D I have never heard this word before! And therefore I cannot tell you what preposition would go with it!! I wouldn't spend a lot of time on this one. I think I can go through my entire life speaking English and never have the opportunity to use it. If I did, I would get lots of looks like this: :eek: :confused: :mad:
     

    Eugens

    Senior Member
    Argentina Spanish
    Hi!!! I have looked it up in my dictionary (as always, because I love to look up words in my dictionary :p) and I found:
    cogitate [intransitive + about/on] formal
    to think carefully and seriously about something
    Archimedes stroked his beard and retired to cogitate.

    Traducción: meditar, reflexionar (about or on sobre)
    I hope this helps!
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    jacinta said:
    Henrik, I hope you are being sarcastic here :D I have never heard this word before! And therefore I cannot tell you what preposition would go with it!! I wouldn't spend a lot of time on this one. I think I can go through my entire life speaking English and never have the opportunity to use it. If I did, I would get lots of looks like this: :eek: :confused: :mad:
    Jacinta, this is a formal word (of Latin origin >> do you remember Descartes' famous quote "Cogito ergo sum" >> I think, then I exist ?). This word is mostly used in the philosoplical field, not that you use it in everyday speech.
    Not even in Spanish we use it.

    Saludos
     

    Eugens

    Senior Member
    Argentina Spanish
    In Spanish, we have "cogitar". The RAE says:
    cogitar.
    (Del lat. cogitāre).
    1. tr. ant. Reflexionar o meditar.
    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

    But, have you ever heard someone in a normal conversation say: "Me parece que tenemos que ponernos a cogitar sobre ésto" o "¡Cogitemos!"? :eek: :p
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Artrella said:
    Jacinta, this is a formal word (of Latin origin >> do you remember Descartes' famous quote "Cogito ergo sum" >> I think, then I exist ?). This word is mostly used in the philosoplical field, not that you use it in everyday speech.
    Not even in Spanish we use it.

    Saludos
    Thank you Art, but I can use the dictionary like anyone else :) I am just giving a native's perspective on the usage of the word, be that as it may.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    jacinta said:
    Thank you Art, but I can use the dictionary like anyone else :) I am just giving a native's perspective on the usage of the word, be that as it may.

    oh, oh :eek: sorry!! I didn't mean to ...
     

    Swettenham

    Senior Member
    U.S.
    Artrella said:
    Jacinta, this is a formal word (of Latin origin >> do you remember Descartes' famous quote "Cogito ergo sum" >> I think, therefore/hence/thus I exist/am ?). This word is mostly used in the philosoplical field, not that you use it in everyday speech.
    Not even in Spanish do we use it. (Hasta así, me suena raro. Yo lo diría así: "We don't even use it in Spanish." o "It is not even used in Spanish.")

    Saludos
    Vine aquí para aprender español, ¡y me ecuentro aprendiendo inglés! I'm going to have to cogitate on this a while... :p

    Por cierto, Nily, normalmente el dicho de Descartes se traduce así: I think, therefore I am. ¿Cómo se dice en español? Pienso/cogito/medito, entonces existo/soy ???
     

    belén

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca
    Swettenham said:
    Vine aquí para aprender español, ¡y me ecuentro aprendiendo inglés! I'm going to have to cogitate on this a while... :p

    Por cierto, Nily, normalmente el dicho de Descartes se traduce así: I think, therefore I am. ¿Cómo se dice en español? Pienso/cogito/medito, entonces existo/soy ???
    Hola
    En español el famoso dicho se traduce así:

    Pienso, luego existo.

    Saludos :)
    Belén
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Swettenham said:
    Por cierto, Nily, normalmente el dicho de Descartes se traduce así: I think, therefore I am. ¿Cómo se dice en español? Pienso/cogito/medito, entonces existo/soy ???

    JoJo, gracias por todas tus correcciones!! Me vienen super bien!! Ultimamente no estoy "cogitando" mucho.... :eek: pero gracias a gente como vos... aprendo cosas que ya debería saber...no? Gracias Amigo! :thumbsup:
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The word cogitate is not at all unusual to me.
    It is used intransitively in a rather humorous way to describe someone who appears to be deep in thought and may not be paying attention to the rest of the group.
    "Leave him alone, he's cogitating."
    He may, in fact, be asleep.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Panj is correct. It's not common; nor is it rare. I've heard it used exactly as Panj has.

    For what it may be worth, it's closer to cavilar than to reflexionar or meditar, both of which suggest 'to ponder'.

    cavilar.
    (Del lat. cavillāre).
    1. tr. Pensar con intención o profundidad en algo. U. t. c. intr.


    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados
     
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