Coke/Pepsi (as the subject) IS (or ARE?) unhealthy...

tyrp

New Member
Russian
Dear friends,
Could you please help me with the use of verbs after subjects separated by a slash?
Should the verb be used in the singular or plural if the general meaning of the sentence doesn't depend on what we understand by '/' (AND or OR)?
E.g. Coke/Pepsi (as the subject) IS (or ARE?) unhealthy...
May/could is (are?) used to show the degree of certainty...

Which use is the more traditional?
Thanks a million in advance as I've come to a dead end.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The answer is very simple. Coke is a name. Pepsi is a name. Ivan is a name. Coke, Pepsi and Ivan are all singular. Singular names and nouns take a singular verb.

    Coke and Pepsi are brand names.
    Coke is an ingredient of Cuba Libre -> Cuba Libre
    Pepsi has a high sugar content.
     

    tyrp

    New Member
    Russian
    Dear PaulQ, thanks for trying to help me, but I still don't get it.
    Actually it doesn't matter what we enumerate using a forward slash, Coke or Pepsi. What about the form of the verb - singular or plural - if we have 2 subjects in one sentence separated with a forward slash? There are lots of such sentences in English, especially when it comes to rules. Could you please make it a bit clearer?
    May/could is (are?) used to show the degree of certainty...
    Which verb form is necessary?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Sorry, I might have misunderstood. I see that by "Coke/Pepsi" you mean "Either Coke and Pepsi" or "Coke and/or Pepsi." :thumbsup:

    In this sense, it is "Coke/Pepsi has a high sugar content." because this sentence means "Coke has a high sugar content and Pepsi has a high sugar content." - you are using alternative singular subjects.
     

    tyrp

    New Member
    Russian
    Thank you so much, dear PaulQ and Glenfarclas for your answers and help!
    Special thanks to PaulQ. You've taken a load off my mind!
     
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