cold biscuit

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Mr Bones

Senior Member
España - Español
Hello, friends. I wanted to ask you about the word biscuit in the following sentence:

She went over my patent-leather shoes with a cold biscuit until she saw her face in them (To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee).

Do you know what a cold biscuit is? Because I don't see how you can polish your shoes with a biscuit if a biscuit is what I think it is.

Thank you, Mr Bones.
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hello Mr Bones,
    I've never heard that expression before. It's not common in the northern U.S. I'll go hunting, and let you know if I find anything.

    ciao,
    cuchu
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Yikes!

    I found one site that says, "You know you are from North Carolina if....You shined your black patent leather shoes with a cold biscuit your mother made." I still have no idea if this is a real, edible biscuit, or the name of something else.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    "Biscuit" in the U.S. does not mean the same thing as "biscuit" in the UK. That may be part of the confusion.

    A biscuit in the U.S. is a small hard dough-like muffin (if that makes any sense :)). The closest thing I tasted in England was a scone. A cold biscuit will often be greasy or oily on the outside. I suppose you could use the oil from the biscuit to shine your shoes.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It seems as if people really did shine patent leather shoes with cold biscuits, as JamesM describes:

    held my feet up one at a time and allowed the congregation behind me to admire my shiny black patent leather Mary Jane’s. They were very shiny because my Granny had shined them the night before with a cold biscuit, I know it sounds odd, but her biscuits could put a sheen of a shine on patent leather!

    http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cach...hoes+"cold+biscuit"&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=54&gl=us
     
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