colleague vs peer vs counterpart

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Abedul_2f

Senior Member
Español, Spain
Hello folks,

I would like to know if "colleague" can be used to name a person who works at the same profession as you, but they not necessarily work with you. I'm a self-employed translator and I want to know how to refer to other self-employed translators.

My colleagues? My peers? My counterparts?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I would call them colleagues.

    My counterpart would be someone who does the same job as me for a different company/organisation/country, etc. For example, if I were the accountant of company X, I would have a counterpart working for company Y, who wold be the accountant of that company.

    My peers are, broadly speaking, all people of the same status as me - free citizens that are not lords, kings, counts... or slaves, serfs or other pariah :D
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    My colleagues -indicates a vague friendliness towards, or common bond with, them, e.g. "My colleagues over in New York do that sort of thing. Give them a call; mention my name."

    My
    peers - very formal, old-fashioned, stilted. Most frequently used as an adjective in, e,g, "a peer reviewed journal".

    My
    counterparts - neutral but rarely used in the plural. (You (singular) usually only have one counterpart; We may have counterparts.) More likely to be used when referring to an anonymous person, e.g. "I cannot do the job but my counterpart in Berlin will be able to help."
     

    Abedul_2f

    Senior Member
    Español, Spain
    How about "My fellow translators?"
    But if I say "In order that my clients and fellow translators can profit from it", does it imply that I know those translators?

    What I want to say is that I hope that the glossary that I'll include in my website will be used by other translators, bu I do not necessarily know them.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    But if I say "In order that my clients and fellow translators can profit from it", does it imply that I know those translators?

    What I want to say is that I hope that the glossary that I'll include in my website will be used by other translators, bu I do not necessarily know them.
    It depends on what one means by know. I talked to many a client on the 'phone, but I didn't know most of them.
    If you are talking about fellow translators something similar applies. You may have only mail and telephone contact with other translators in your company or you may go out to the pub after work together...

    There is no implication that you know, or you do not know your fellow translators.

    GF..

    In practise you probably would know some of them ..
     

    Abedul_2f

    Senior Member
    Español, Spain
    It depends on what one means by know. I talked to many a client on the 'phone, but I didn't know most of them.
    If you are talking about fellow translators something similar applies. You may have only mail and telephone contact with other translators in your company or you may go out to the pub after work together...

    There is no implication that you know, or you do not know your fellow translators.

    GF..

    In practise you probably would know some of them ..
    In fact, I'm referring to random translators that could find my website on the internet and profit from my glossary. So I'm talking about people that I have not seen or talked to in my life. So, would "my fellow translators" be appropriate in this context?

    Many thanks to all of you for the explanations!
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    It depends how colloquial and friendly you want your tone to be.
    You could say: 'Here is something for all my fellow-translators out there'.
    This strikes an informal and friendly note.
     

    Abedul_2f

    Senior Member
    Español, Spain
    It depends how colloquial and friendly you want your tone to be.
    You could say: 'Here is something for all my fellow-translators out there'.
    This strikes an informal and friendly note.
    Thanks, wandle, but I pretend quite the opposite. I need it to sound really formal. I'll place the word (either colleagues or fellow translators) in this sentence:

    In order that my clients and colleagues / fellow translators can profit from it,... ["it" refers to a glossary that I will include in my Website; and "the colleagues/translators" to random internet users who work as translators]
     

    ncpenglish

    New Member
    Chinese
    Why do you want to make it sound really formal?
    It's your website, not a (publishing) company's website. :)
    I think "fellow" is better.
    It seems that many not-so-advanced dictionaries define "colleague" as sb you work with/together, so I'm afraid it's kinda misleading?
     

    jarabina

    Senior Member
    English - Scotland
    I think the important thing here to think about is what kind of outcome you are looking for. It seems to me that you are trying to tell translators in general that they can use your site. If that's the case, I would go with the most general and most simple, i.e. other translators. All the other words imply that you know them (unless you add 'out there', but if your website is formal then that would be out of place).
     
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