collective embrace of all things

chobalsim

Senior Member
Korea, Korean
Since 9/11, we have had to close ranks. But the collective embrace of all things American, to the exclusion of anything else, has taken the place of a much richer, much more enduring, much more profound version of love of country. This unchecked pride asserts the supremacy of America above all others.

Is "the collective embrace of all things" a subject in this sentence???
I think (________________) has replace a much richer...love of country.
Am I right? I have some problem to understand the first part of the sentence.


I hope this one is really the last thread. :D
 
  • coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    I think it's the subject. Embrace is a noun here.
    "close ranks" ——(of a group of people)to join together to face difficulties
    Chobalsim, according to all of your posts, I think the article you're reading is criticizing Americans's patriotism which has grown to an extent that is unendurable for other nations.
    I'm only telling my understanding of the article, not stating my own opinion.
     

    chobalsim

    Senior Member
    Korea, Korean
    Oh, coconutpalm is Chinese. :)
    Yes, the author, who is himself an American, criticizes American "unconditional" patriotism.
    And yes, "embrace" is an noun here. But what makes me confused is where the subject ends.
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    I think it ends with "American", which modifies "things".
    Have you watched the movie "the Perfect Man"? The boy calls the mom, pretending to be the man she falls in love with, and on her request to describe China, he says "China, um, China is very Chinese!"
    I think "American" means the same thing: very unique American way/style.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Subject: embrace
    verb: has taken
    object: place

    Everything else is a modifying word or part of a modifying phrase for "embrace" or "place."
    .
     

    chobalsim

    Senior Member
    Korea, Korean
    Thank you, coconutpalm and foxfirebrand.
    Is it common to write "all things American" meaning "all American things?
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    I think they mean differently, but I don't know how to explain it.
    Fox must have a good explanation. By the way, could you tell me whether I'm right in my understanding? Thanks in advance!
     

    french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    chobalsim said:
    Thank you, coconutpalm and foxfirebrand.
    Is it common to write "all things American" meaning "all American things?
    Yes, the phrase "all things American" is seen fairly often, but it's definitely more literary/formal; for some reason, I understand instinctively that it means non-physical 'things' such as attitudes, behavior, whereas if I hear "all American things" it makes me think of physical items.
     
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