Collective noun for umpires

Discussion in 'English Only' started by cmnk, Jun 3, 2017.

  1. cmnk

    cmnk Senior Member

    Kerala, India
    Malayalam
    Hi...
    What is the collective noun for 'umpires'?
    Is 'flight' right?
    Is 'line', 'set' or 'number' possible?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    Have you a sentence in which you want to use this unlikely word? Any particular type of umpires?
     
  3. cmnk

    cmnk Senior Member

    Kerala, India
    Malayalam
    A ______of umpires was selected for the test matches.
     
  4. panel

    (Collins)

    also pool

    (Merriam-Webster)
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2017
  5. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    Just to be clear, these are not collective words for umpires. That is, they can apply to any group of people who are selected for a specific purpose - umpires, crematorium medical referees, judges, duty social workers, ...

    Your sentence could just as well use 'group', although I would probably copy Rover and use 'panel' in your context.
     
  6. Barque Senior Member

    India
    Tamil
    Makes them sound like animals.:) Or birds.

    <-----Off-topic comment removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 4, 2017
  7. cmnk

    cmnk Senior Member

    Kerala, India
    Malayalam
    Thanks to all:D:thumbsup:
     
  8. Englishmypassion

    Englishmypassion Senior Member

    Nainital
    India - Hindi
    As a cricket follower, I usually here "panel of umpires".
     
  9. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    In baseball, the umpires are collectively referred to as the crew, in the sense that the main one is called the "crew chief" Umpire (baseball) - Wikipedia. That does not mean we can call it a collective because we don't say a "crew of umpires" in the same way we'd say a "murder of crows"
     
  10. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    Bunch is probably a generic venereal collective - I also use it for lots (is that another???) of things but I think the OP was after the specific collective for umps (gaggle of geese, etc instead of bunch of geese, but a bunch of flowers would be OK I suppose:)) a group of crows is called a murder?!
     
  11. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    You could use pool if it refers to a group of umpires from which the umpires who will work at specific games are chosen. For example, thirty-six umpires are chosen to work at the first stage of the U.S. major league professional baseball championships. These 36 form a pool. Six umpires are chosen from that pool to work each game. The size of the pool is reduced as the field becomes smaller: first to 24, then to 12. Finally, six umpires are chosen to work the last stage of the championships: the World* Series. At that point it is no longer appropriate to refer to them as a "pool."

    _________________________
    *Many people have pointed out that this is a poor name for a championship that only includes teams from the U.S. and Canada. This is not the place to revisit that topic.
     
  12. Barque Senior Member

    India
    Tamil
    Perhaps you meant to use a different word.
     
  13. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    Another Country
    English English
    It's the right word, Mr Barque, just not the right spelling (venerial ~ I had to look it up ... I just assumed JS had it right:cool:):)
     
  14. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    I was quoting a (sic) post in that other thread
     
  15. Englishmypassion

    Englishmypassion Senior Member

    Nainital
    India - Hindi
    I'm enjoying this CC thread, but I'm unable to understand the meaning of "venereal" there - - "venerial" I can't find in dictionaries.

    Thanks.
     
  16. RedwoodGrove

    RedwoodGrove Senior Member

    California
    English, USA
    A "slate" of umpires comes close.

    Also "panel". (Which Rover suggested)
     
  17. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    The City of New York
    USA - English
    "Venereal terms", meaning terms such as "pride" of lions, or "murder" of crows, uses "venereal" as the adjectival form of the noun "venery", which is an obsolete word meaning "hunting."
     

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