collocation about 'ridden up' and 'a road'

< Previous | Next >

fishinthetree

Senior Member
chinese
Original Text:
The previous day’s
journey felt unreal in the bold clarity of this light. Had he really ridden up that trackwith the boy? Had he really seen Ben Llewellyn, a giant of a man, unfold from the lean-to shed, an axe dangling from his arm? Yes, the ache along the inside of his thighsconfirmed the ride and there, on the bedside table, was the book that Ben had given



him last night, unopened, the gold lettering of its title catching a tight beam of lightshining through a crack in the curtains.

My question:
Someone says track here can be understood as 'a village road', so my question is that "ridden up" can be collocated with "the road" in English language? Many thanks.

Source:
Owen Sheers’s

 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm a bit puzzled by your question.
    You can certainly ride up a road if you're on a horse.

    I think I've probably missed something:eek:.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    got it, thanks. :)
    I'm not sure that you have. :eek: The example should be understood as "The previous day’s journey felt unreal in the bold clarity of this light. Had he really ridden on a horse up that track with the boy?"

    You can ride a horse almost anywhere. It is very likely that the word "track" means exactly that - a pathway or bridleway - not a village road.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top