Come at me bro

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  • So can it or can't it be used?
    I read it somewhere, so this question just popped up in my mind
    • It means:"Come At Me Bro” is a confrontational expression used to suggest that one will not physically initiate a fight but is willing to fight if the situation arises
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "Come at me!" is a command meaning "attack me". It is used to initiate a fight. It has no other meaning.

    "Bro" is short for "brother". It is AAVE (black American) slang for a black male. Some non-blacks use it in "street talk" (low-class slang). There is zero reason for adding "bro" at the end of "Come at me". It would only be done by someone who uses "bro" constantly for people.

    I can't think of any situation where anyone would call a girl "brother" or "bro". The equivalent AAVE expression for a female is "girl". So they might say "Come at me, girl!"

    Or they might replace "bro/girl" with an insulting or demeaning term: possibly an obscene one.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    My older daughter calls her female friends “bro” all the time. (Also our hamster, but he is male.) She is not African-American, but she may be low-class; I certainly am.

    I think “come at me, bro” has reached the level of a set phrase among the college-age group.

    Edit: I should note that I do not recommend this usage (of “bro,” or of “come at me”) to English learners.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Or they might replace "bro/girl" with an insulting or demeaning term: possibly an obscene one.
    From what I've seen on "reality" TV, it would mostly likely be replaced by a different word beginning with "b".
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Come at somebody' is a perfectly normal verb meaning to attack somebody. "He came at his neighbour with a basball bat".
    It's saying it tauntingly to somebody that's the problem!

    Come close to me.
    If I want somebody to come close to me that's what I say, not "Come at me!"
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    My older daughter calls her female friends “bro” all the time. (Also our hamster, but he is male.) She is not African-American, but she may be low-class; I certainly am.

    I think “come at me, bro” has reached the level of a set phrase among the college-age group.

    Edit: I should note that I do not recommend this usage (of “bro,” or of “come at me”) to English learners.
    I concur with pob14 for the most part, especially in that "come at me bro" (including "bro") has become a set phrase and also that learners may have difficulty with the subtleties of when it is and is not appropriate to use, so probably are better off avoiding it unless they have an especial facility with that kind of slang usage.

    "Come at me bro" has currency with a certain fairly large group of native English speakers which even includes a lot of people who don't use "bro" by itself much to address people. It is not exclusively used to address persons who identify as male. I believe it's primarily used in the USA. I've heard it used in US created media quite a lot as well, including, for example, the Geico commerical "Manatees in novelty tees" where one of the manatees is wearing a t-shirt that says "come at me bro" -- there is no way to tell the gender of the manatee portrayed.

     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, it can be said with a sense of humor as a set phrase, no matter the people involved.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's similar to "Don't tase me, bro!"

    I would link, but there's a video there.

    On September 17th, 2007, Senator John Kerry gave a speech at the University of Florida ... Nearing the end of the event, undergraduate student Andrew Meyer walked up to the microphone stand and criticized Kerry for repeatedly evading his questions:

    ... but Meyer pushed his argument to the point in which school officials shut off his microphone. Meyer was eventually forced away from the area by police and tasered repeatedly while he screamed, “Don’t tase me, bro!”

    It's not necessarily used literally. The most prominent police officer in the accompanying photo is a woman. (I don't know who he was saying the quoted words to or whether it might have been a general comment.)
     
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