come calling

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chobalsim

Banned
India-Hindi
When rebels came calling...
Job offers came calling for new math graduate.
Love Came Calling...
The day death came calling...

What does "come calling" mean in the above sentences?
I found that the expression is frequently used as a title of a book, movie...
I guess it means "something came to me suddenly" but seems to have some additional nuances.
 
  • JerseyRich

    Senior Member
    the expression "came calling" is a bit like. It came looking for you.
    For example "death came looking for you"
    "death came calling"

    "The police came calling"
    "The police came looking for you"
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hi chobalism,

    I can only speak of what history I know in Western Europe and the U.S. In the days before telephones (and even automobiles), neighbors and relatives would commonly visit, or call on, one other as a means of socialization and communication. While mail existed, it was not always reliable. In-home visits - or calls - were part of one's daily social agenda.

    You would either call on someone, or someone would call on you.

    It was also common in certain societies for people to have small cards made with their names printed on them. These were called calling cards and were left at someone's home if they themselves were not home or otherwise not able to receive visitors.

    The expression "came calling" means, as has already been mentioned, came to visit.
     

    Txiri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    You all beat me to it, with the calling card explanations.

    I might though go back and add that: (and you can see how all these aspects tie up)

    When rebels came calling... When the rebels showed up, when they came around
    Job offers came calling for new math graduate. Job offers were coming in ...
    Love Came Calling...
    The day death came calling... (for both) came knocking at the door

    A caller is a guest, a visitor. I would comfortably venture as well, that "to call" as in on the telephone, arose out of this practice of calling on people you were maintaining a social relationship with.
     

    Maharaj

    Senior Member
    Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
    Hi chobalism,

    I can only speak of what history I know in Western Europe and the U.S. In the days before telephones (and even automobiles), neighbors and relatives would commonly visit, or call on, one other as a means of socialization and communication. While mail existed, it was not always reliable. In-home visits - or calls - were part of one's daily social agenda.

    You would either call on someone, or someone would call on you.

    It was also common in certain societies for people to have small cards made with their names printed on them. These were called calling cards and were left at someone's home if they themselves were not home or otherwise not able to receive visitors.

    The expression "came calling" means, as has already been mentioned, came to visit.
    Liked this tidbit on history :)
     
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