come January

thédechine

Senior Member
Italiano
In the sentence:

"I’ll be standing here come January", is "come January" an idiom? And if this is the case what does it mean?
The source is a book, The Miniaturist, and the context is a girl standing on the threshold of a house, waiting for someone to open the door.

Thank you.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It means when January comes, or in January.

    I'm not sure how common it is, my family use it a lot, but I've a feeling it might be a dialect term in some areas, rather than standard English.
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    It means when January comes, or in January.

    I'm not sure how common it is, my family use it a lot, but I've a feeling it might be a dialect term in some areas, rather than standard English.
    To me it sounds a bit old-fashioned rather than regional, but expressions don't fall into disuse at the same time everywhere, so they become regional over time.
    This construction is used in other contexts, like "Come the revolution, they'll be the first against the wall!" But I wouldn't use it when speaking seriously.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    No, "come January" doesn't mean "until January". It means "when January arrives."

    Come spring, I'll go out in the yard and rake up last fall's dead leaves. That means I'll do it when spring arrives.

    "Until spring" would mean I plan to spend the time between now and the arrival of spring doing the raking, which would not make sense. (Actually, I couldn't anyway, since the leaves are covered with snow.)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top