Come June, it's our 40th anniversary.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by AliBadass, Apr 21, 2014.

  1. AliBadass

    AliBadass Senior Member

    IRAN
    persian
    In the series Prison Break, the warden of the prison is talking to an inmate about building a model of Taj Mahal for his wife and says: Come June, it's our 40th anniversary.

    What does he mean by saying ''come June''? Why does he use ''come''? Why doesn't he say ''in'' June?

    A link to the transcript:http://prisonbreak.wikia.com/wiki/Pilot_(episode)/Transcript
     
  2. Miss Julie

    Miss Julie Senior Member

    Chicago metro area
    English-U.S.
    It means "when June comes/arrives" (when it's June). It's slang.
     
  3. Liam Lew's Senior Member

  4. Miss Julie

    Miss Julie Senior Member

    Chicago metro area
    English-U.S.
    It's regional/old-fashioned slang. :)
     
  5. AliBadass

    AliBadass Senior Member

    IRAN
    persian
    Thank you. Then why doesn't he say ''Comes June''?
     
  6. Liam Lew's Senior Member

    Okay, thank you.:)
     
  7. Miss Julie

    Miss Julie Senior Member

    Chicago metro area
    English-U.S.
    That's just how the phrase goes, Ali. :eek:
     
  8. AliBadass

    AliBadass Senior Member

    IRAN
    persian
    Thank you.
     
  9. e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 75)
    UK English
    It's not slang, it's an idiom.
    The phrase come rain or shine is an idiomatic phrase, meaning if it rains or if it's sunny (tomorrow, for example). This is not quite the same as Come June.
     
  10. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod (English Only)

    I agree with e2efour. "Come what may" and "come hell or high water" are two other idiomatic phrases in English. It's deeply embedded in the language.
     
  11. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Personally, I'm still inclined to see this "come" as the present subjunctive of the verb "[to] come".

    But I think etb may well be right when he suggests here that it's now become a preposition.
     
  12. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    Oh let's not banish the subjunctive just yet.

    Come June
    Come the revolution
    Come what may
    Come hell or high water
    Come rain or shine

    ...are all lovely examples of the present subjunctive.
     
  13. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Well, I'll try to drag some energy from somewhere and ask why you don't think it's made the transition to being a preposition, Biffo.

    I think it probably has. But I'm too knackered to argue about it.
     
  14. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    I just like the English subjunctive and resent people trying to devalue it by calling it something else. In any case I don't see how it's a preposition. I don't particularly want to argue about it though.
     
  15. e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 75)
    UK English
    You'll be delighted to know, Biffo, that Quirk et al. in their grammar describe come winter as an example of a temporal clause in the subjunctive.
     
  16. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    Well that's made my day! :cool:
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
  17. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    In all fairness, etb did not say this use of 'come' was a preposition,
    (My emphasis.)

    "Transformational Grammar" Andrew Radford, Cambridge University Press.

    "Come March..." :tick:
    "Right come March..." :cross:
     
  18. AliBadass

    AliBadass Senior Member

    IRAN
    persian
    What's the difference? Is it important?
     
  19. e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 75)
    UK English
    The word slang can be defined in different ways. Here is one: "Words, phrases, and uses that are regarded as very informal and are often restricted to special contexts or are peculiar to a specified profession, class, etc. (e.g. racing slang, schoolboy slang)." An idiom is a phrase whose meaning is difficult to understand.
    The difference is important since when you speak or write slang (sometimes called jargon), you are using words that are not suitable for the situation, are sometimes substandard and soon become out of date.
    For example, you can call a woman good-looking, but it would be slang to call her a cracker or a bit of all right. A good-looking male could be called a beefcake.
     
  20. AliBadass

    AliBadass Senior Member

    IRAN
    persian
    Thank you. And what does it matter here either it's slang or an idiom? Would it bother anyone?
     
  21. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod (English Only)

    By "here" do you mean this forum? Slang would not be suitable in a business conversation, for example, while an idiom often would be. They are different classifications of words. It's not so much that it bothers anyone but that it gives you a different idea of when it would be appropriate to use.
     
  22. AliBadass

    AliBadass Senior Member

    IRAN
    persian
    Thank you. So now is it an idiom or slang? No one proved it.
     
  23. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod (English Only)

    What kind of proof are you looking for?

    Here's an entry from a dictionary of American idioms and phrasal verbs:

    http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/come+Monday
    come Monday
    Rur. when Monday comes. (Can be used with other expressions for time, as in come next week, come December, come five o'clock. See the second example.) Joe plays so hard on the weekend that come Monday, he's all worn out. You may think that putting up storm windows is a bother, but come December, you'll be glad you did it.

    McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
     

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