Come June, it's our 40th anniversary.

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  • Liam Lew's

    Senior Member

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's not slang, it's an idiom.
    The phrase come rain or shine is an idiomatic phrase, meaning if it rains or if it's sunny (tomorrow, for example). This is not quite the same as Come June.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Personally, I'm still inclined to see this "come" as the present subjunctive of the verb "[to] come".

    But I think etb may well be right when he suggests here that it's now become a preposition.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Personally, I'm still inclined to see this "come" as the present subjunctive of the verb "[to] come".

    But I think etb may well be right when he suggests here that it's now become a preposition.
    Oh let's not banish the subjunctive just yet.

    Come June
    Come the revolution
    Come what may
    Come hell or high water
    Come rain or shine

    ...are all lovely examples of the present subjunctive.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, I'll try to drag some energy from somewhere and ask why you don't think it's made the transition to being a preposition, Biffo.

    I think it probably has. But I'm too knackered to argue about it.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Well, I'll try to drag some energy from somewhere and ask why you don't think it's made the transition to being a preposition, Biffo.
    I think it probably has. But I'm too knackered to argue about it.
    I just like the English subjunctive and resent people trying to devalue it by calling it something else. In any case I don't see how it's a preposition. I don't particularly want to argue about it though.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In all fairness, etb did not say this use of 'come' was a preposition,
    It's probably easier to regard this time-related 'come' as a preposition now.
    (My emphasis.)

    As for the distributional properties of Prepositions, well, they alone can be premodified (i.e. modified and preceded) by right in the sense of 'completely':

    (30) (a) Go right up the ladder [...]
    "Transformational Grammar" Andrew Radford, Cambridge University Press.

    "Come March..." :tick:
    "Right come March..." :cross:
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The word slang can be defined in different ways. Here is one: "Words, phrases, and uses that are regarded as very informal and are often restricted to special contexts or are peculiar to a specified profession, class, etc. (e.g. racing slang, schoolboy slang)." An idiom is a phrase whose meaning is difficult to understand.
    The difference is important since when you speak or write slang (sometimes called jargon), you are using words that are not suitable for the situation, are sometimes substandard and soon become out of date.
    For example, you can call a woman good-looking, but it would be slang to call her a cracker or a bit of all right. A good-looking male could be called a beefcake.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    By "here" do you mean this forum? Slang would not be suitable in a business conversation, for example, while an idiom often would be. They are different classifications of words. It's not so much that it bothers anyone but that it gives you a different idea of when it would be appropriate to use.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    What kind of proof are you looking for?

    Here's an entry from a dictionary of American idioms and phrasal verbs:

    http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/come+Monday
    come Monday
    Rur. when Monday comes. (Can be used with other expressions for time, as in come next week, come December, come five o'clock. See the second example.) Joe plays so hard on the weekend that come Monday, he's all worn out. You may think that putting up storm windows is a bother, but come December, you'll be glad you did it.

    McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
     
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