come morning

Faycelina

Senior Member
Polish
Hi,
I'm just reading a book about pregnancy ;) And I found a strange construction for me. Can anyone confirm if I understand well?

Context: morning nausea; before getting up from bed it's good to eat something small or drink cacao.
Sentence: It'll pick you up come morning.
I'm concerned about the underlined phrase. Can I understand this sentence as: It'll pick you up when morning comes / in the morning ?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hi Faycelina. Yes, it's exactly that. It's kind of a fixed expression: come + time/date/event:

    It'll pick you up come morning [when morning comes]
    Come the revolution [when the revolution happens] there will be no more banks

    etc.:)
     

    lapot

    Senior Member
    Hello. I want to open this thread again to ask a question.

    I've seen, for example, "come Monday" meaning "when Monday comes."

    I've seen in 'McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs' it's considered a rural expression and in the 'Oxford dictionary' it's tagged as a old-fahioned expression.

    Do you agree with this? Or do you think is quite often used?

    Thanks mates!
     

    rinmach

    Senior Member
    English, Russian
    Hello. I want to open this thread again to ask a question.

    I've seen, for example, "come Monday" meaning "when Monday comes."

    I've seen in 'McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs' it's considered a rural expression and in the 'Oxford dictionary' it's tagged as a old-fahioned expression.

    Do you agree with this? Or do you think is quite often used?

    Thanks mates!
    In my experience, the phrase would only be used in formal contexts or in writing, never in informal or casual conversation.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It's probably best left to native speakers to use this sort of phrase, because although I would say I do hear it, and most people would understand it, it might sound a bit odd from a non-native because it has a regional feel to it.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Unlike Rinmach (who presumably speaks AE), I'd call it definitely casual/informal. As for Suzi, it feels kind of regional to me too ... or bucolic ... or proletarian ... difficult to pinpoint. But old-fashioned? ~ yes. And certainly not a commonly heard turn-of-phrase.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    My very quick Google search shows it to be very popular as a name and in poems / lyrics. I trawled quite deep down in the pages and didn't find any that looked like representations of every day speech!
     

    Tizona

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    I found this thread because I was looking for some clarification on this bit from a New York Times article I read today:

    "Two other reporters involved in the coverage — Josh Saul, a Newsweek writer, and Josh Keefe, a writer at the affiliated International Business Times — were locked out of their computers and email accounts on Monday. They were not fired, but did not know whether they would still have jobs come morning."

    So I think it's fair to say it's much more common in AmE than in BrE.

    Thanks guys.
     
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