Come off [better, worse]

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Are the uses of the British Phrasal "come off" idiomatic/common in the sentences below? If not, what do you suggest? Please take a look.


a. In Brazil, employers always come off better. Employees often lose money and don't get paid for everything they do.
b. John always comes off worse at home. His mother always takes his sister's side.


Come off[better, worse]: gain more or lose more in a situation.


Thank you in advance!
 
  • quesuerte

    Senior Member
    Oxford English UK
    a. In Brazil, employers always come off better. Employees often lose money and don't get paid for everything they do.:tick:
    b. John always comes off worse at home. His mother always takes his sister's side.:tick:
    Lovely. Although, I must say it is not a phrasal verb that I use or hear often, except maybe in the expression "Come off it!" ("I don't believe it!" / "No way!")
     

    quesuerte

    Senior Member
    Oxford English UK
    Well, now I have to rack my brains! Haha. I'd opt for something along the lines of:

    to end up better off
    to end up worse off
    to be better off
    to be worse off

    For example - "At home John always ends up worse off, because his mum always takes his sister's side."
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Have you reviewed this previous post on precisely the same expression?
    come off worseI would not relegate "come off" to only British English, especially in view of the "British" reference in our attached dictionary.

    come of
    • 1 result from.

    • 2 be descended from.
    come off
    • 1 be accomplished; succeed.■ fare in a specified way: he always came off worse in an argument.

    • 2 Brit. informal have an orgasm.

     
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