'come on' Friday afternoon

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Please help me understand the verb "come on" in the sentence.
"Could you come on Friday afternoon?"
Thanks.
 
  • Gargoyle

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    hello mimi2

    come =the verb
    on= preposition
    a person is asking you if you can see him/her on that day an this time. Byee
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    mimi2 said:
    Please help me understand the verb "come on" in the sentence.
    "Could you come on Friday afternoon?"
    Thanks.
    Americans usually say
    "Can you come Friday?" or
    "It happened Wednesday". or
    "The president announced Tuesday that ..."

    Speakers of BE usually say
    "Can you come on Friday?" or
    "It happened on Wednesday" or
    "The Prime Minister announced on Tuesday that ..."
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Brioche said:
    Americans usually say
    "Can you come Friday?" or
    "It happened Wednesday". or
    "The president announced Tuesday that ..."
    I disagree with this. While it may be true that the ommission of "on" in cases such as these is common in AP (Associated Press) style (therefore by US news sources), "on" is still alive and well in such contexts in spoken register. At least it is in my microcosmic portion of the world.

    In fact, I would have to say I use the variant with the preposition more than I omit it, unless I'm writing a press release. It just seems more natural to me.
     

    bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Gargoyle said:
    hello mimi2

    come =the verb
    on= preposition
    a person is asking you if you can see him/her on that day an this time. Byee
    This is correct. The verb is not come on but come. The preposition on is part of the phrase on Friday afternoon.
     

    bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Míde said:
    But if you heard someone say just "come on!", it usually means "hurry up!"
    I suppose expressions such as come on and come again are colloquial. They seem only to have an imperative form.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top