come out with

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ordinarydaniel

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,

Lately I learned a phrase "come out with," which means to say something. So, can I write the following sentence this way? Does the bold part sound natural to English native speakers? Thanks.

"When the Lord Jesus came out with her having had five husbands, the Samaritan woman was very surprised and found out that He was the coming Messiah."
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Come out with" can mean the introduction of a new product or thought--the thought often blurted out. I think "stated" or "announced" would work better.

    Mazda came out with a new engine that does not use spark plugs.

    I can't believe you just came out with that remark.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hi ordinarydaniel, you are right in the way you understand the meaning of the phrase, but if you use "come out with" it is emotively marked: it shows that you think the utterance was surprising, unexpected, funny, offensive etc., depending on the context. You are showing some kind of emotional response (surprise, anger, amusement, etc.). It's not stylistically neutral like "say".
    35. come out with, [~ + out + with + object] to reveal by stating; blurt out; say:
    - He came out with a ridiculous remark. (WR)

    come out with
    something (phrasal verb)
    to say something, especially something unusual or unexpected
    - The things he comes out with are so funny! (Longman)
    When I asked him to pay back the money I lent him, he came out with some pathetic excuse. :tick:
    When I asked him what the capital of China is, he came out with "Moscow"! :tick:
    When I asked him what the capital of China is, he came out with "Beijing"! :cross:

    "Came out with" in my last example isn't appropriate, because the statement is not surprising in any way. It's the right answer (I think :D).

    In your example, "came out with" is acceptable because the Samaritan woman was surprised at what she heard.
     
    Last edited:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Hello,

    Lately I learned a phrase "come out with," which means to say something. So, can I write the following sentence this way? Does the bold part sound natural to English native speakers? Thanks.

    "When the Lord Jesus came out with her having had five husbands, the Samaritan woman was very surprised and found out that He was the coming Messiah."
    Since you asked for more opinions, I’d say you’ve been well guided on the general principles of how to use the expression.

    However, I find you actual sentence very bizarre. Maybe it would help if I knew the story, but any sentence that collocates Jesus and “came out with” seems improbable to me.
    Plus, what did he actually say? The way you phrased that bit is odd too.

    Did this woman not know she had 5 husbands?

    Because you’ve done it as indirect speech I’d expect it to be:
    He came out with the fact that she had five husbands.
     
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